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DRIVING

‘I’m late for my Covid vaccine’ says 88-year-old Frenchman caught driving at 191 km/h

An 88-year-old man caught speeding at a breakneck 191 kilometres per hour on a French country road told officers that he was late for his Covid-19 vaccine appointment, police said.

'I'm late for my Covid vaccine' says 88-year-old Frenchman caught driving at 191 km/h
The driver, a local, "gave as a reason for his speeding that he was late for his anti-Covid vaccine" said police. Photo: AFP

The speed limit on the road where he was picked up on Thursday is 110 kilometres per hour, police in the eastern French Bas-Rhin département said on Facebook.

The driver, a local, “gave as a reason for his speeding that he was late for his Covid vaccine”, it said.

Officers confiscated the man’s driving licence and impounded his car.

“For everyone’s safety, let’s comply with speed limits, even after more than 60 years with a driving licence,” the post said.

France’s sluggish vaccine rollout has been the cause of much frustration among those groups who are currently eligible – mainly the over 75s, healthcare workers and people with serious health conditions.

READ ALSO 6 reasons why France’s vaccine rollout has been so slow

The strategy is showing results, Prime Minister Jean Castex said on Thursday, with the rate of new infections among over 80-year-olds falling, although has been rising in other age groups.

Member comments

  1. Very slow progress. Here in the UK they have already vaccinated every over 65 year old who wants it. France & Germany seem to be way behind the curve and why oh why are they not using the Oxford Astra Zeneca for over 65 when its safe?

  2. Here are 12 important questions and answers before considering getting vaccinated:

    ●”If I get vaccinated can I stop wearing a mask(s)?”
    Government: “NO”
    ●”If I get vaccinated will the restaurants, bars, schools, fitness clubs, hair salons, etc. reopen and will people be able to get back to work like normal?
    Government: “NO”
    ●”If I get vaccinated will I be resistant to Covid?”
    Government: “Maybe. We don’t know exactly, but probably not.”
    ●”If I get vaccinated, at least I won’t be contagious to others – right?”
    Government: “NO. the vaccine doesn’t stop transmission.”
    ●”If I get vaccinated, how long will the vaccine last?”
    Government: “No one knows. All Covid “vaccines” are still in the experimental stage.”
    ● “If I get vaccinated, can I stop social distancing?”
    Government: “NO”
    ● “If my parents, grandparents and myself all get vaccinated can we hug each other again?”
    Government: “NO”
    ● “So what’s the benefit of getting vaccinated?”
    Government: “Hoping that the virus won’t kill you.”
    ●”Are you sure the vaccine won’t injure or kill me?”
    Government: “NO”
    ●”If statistically the virus won’t kill me (99.7% survival rate), why should I get vaccinated?”
    Government: “To protect others.”
    ●”So if I get vaccinated, I can protect 100% of people I come in contact with?”
    Government: “NO”
    ● “If I experience a severe adverse reaction, long term effects (still unknown) or die from the vaccine will I (or my family) be compensated from the vaccine manufacture or the Government?”
    Government: “NO – the government and vaccine manufactures have 100% zero liability regarding this experimental drug”
    So to summarize, the Covid19 “vaccine”…
    Does not provide immunity.
    Does not eliminate the virus.
    Does not prevent death.
    Does not guarantee you won’t get it.
    Does not stop you from passing it on to others.
    Does not eliminate the need for travel bans.
    Does not eliminate the need for business closures.
    Does not eliminate the need for lockdowns.
    Does not eliminate the need for masking.

    If after reading this you still decide to get the “vaccine”…GOOD LUCK & DON’T SAY YOU WEREN’T WARNED.
    And people who question this lunacy are called “crazy”.

  3. A very good comment Daniela. People seem to be under the impression that the vaccine stops one from getting it like the Polio vaccine did, it doesn’t. Of course then we get onto the crazy situation of having vaccine passports. Perhaps the people that don’t want the vaccine will have to have an arm tattoo and wear a yellow icon or even be put into camps like members of my family experienced eighty years ago.

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For members

LIVING IN FRANCE

Reader question: Can I buy or sell a car in France if I have a foreign driving licence?

You can drive in France for a certain amount of time with some foreign driving licences. But can you buy or sell a car with one and what other documents do you need?

Reader question: Can I buy or sell a car in France if I have a foreign driving licence?

Let’s start with the good news: a driving licence is not among the list of official documents needed to buy or sell a car in France – just to drive one.

But it’s likely that are asked to provide one when you buy a car.

In that case does what happens if you have a foreign rather than French licence?

We know by reading certain Facebook posts that this question often arises and some people have reported that they were wrongly asked for their French driving licence when buying a car and told that a UK licence, for example, wasn’t acceptable. 

Not having a French driver’s licence should not stop you from being able to buy a car in France.

Kim Cranstoun who runs the Facebook group ‘Applying for a French Driving Licence’ told The Local: “It’s a dealer issue, they have it fixed in their mind that you have to have a French licence mainly because they don’t understand the new agreement and the last thing they read was a UK licence was only valid until the end of 2021.

“As long as you have a valid UK licence you can purchase a car in France. Anyone going into a dealer with a valid UK licence should carry a copy of the agreement,” she said.

Interestingly a driving licence is not on the list of official documents you need to buy a car (see below) but dealer’s will often ask for it if they take charge of registering the car.

What does the seller need?

The seller is responsible for providing the car registration document, called the certificat d’immatriculation and known informally as the Carte Grise.

You must sign a certificat de cession (transfer certificate) along with the buyer, and then declare the sale on the ANTS website within 15 days. 

You should then receive a code de cession (transfer code) which you must also send to the buyer so they can register the vehicle in their name.

If the vehicle is second-hand and more than four-years old, the seller should also provide a recent roadworthiness certificate, proving that the vehicle has passed a contrôle technique (similar to an MoT in the UK), in the past six months.

What does the buyer need?

When you buy a car, you must sign a certificat de cession (transfer certificate) along with the previous owner, who has to declare the sale on the ANTS website within 15 days. 

The seller should then receive a code de cession (transfer code) which they must send you because you will need this to register the vehicle in your name. There is a fee, which usually falls to the buyer to pay for transferring a vehicle registration – which varies depending on the region, type of car, and its CO2 emissions. 

The previous certificat d’immatriculation (registration certificate – aka carte grise) needs to be struck through, and completed with the date of the sale and the seller’s signature.

You will then need to register the car in your name, which can be done online. You have one month to do this, otherwise you risk a fine of up to €750. 

If you are purchasing the car through a dealer, this transfer of registration will be done at the time of the purchase. Be aware, a dealer may ask for your driving licence as part of the process, but – as long as you hold a valid licence, whether it is French or not, you will still be able to go through with your purchase.

In fact, you can ask any certified garage to apply for the carte grise on your behalf, which could save on time and hassle, even if you didn’t buy the car from them.

When applying for a carte grise you will need to submit proof that the vehicle has undergone a contrôle technique (vehicle safety check) within the previous six months if the car is at least four years old.

To register the vehicle, you need the following official documents:

  • Identification (passport or identity card)

  • Proof of residence (typically a utility bill or rental receipt, less than six months old).

  • A copy of the Certificat d’immatriculation/Carte Grise with the appropriate section filled in.

  • The contrôle technique (CT) certificate, if required.

Buying a car with a loan

If you have the funds to buy the vehicle outright, you’ll have no problems – simply hand over the cheque at the appropriate time. It may be harder, however, to access financing for your vehicle if you’re not permanently resident in France.

Driving your new vehicle

If you plan to drive your car away that day, you will also be asked for a copy of a valid insurance certificate for the vehicle – in France, the vehicle is insured rather than the driver. 

Most car insurance companies will provide a provisional certificate to allow you to drive your new purchase. You will then need to finalise details and provide them with a copy of the Carte Grise when it arrives.

Driving licence

If you live permanently in France, sooner or later you may need to swap your driving licence for a French one – but where you learned to drive in the first place could dictate whether you have to take a French driving test. We cover that in depth here – including what’s changed for Britons in France after Brexit.

You can buy some vehicles – known as voitures sans permis – and drive them on some French roads without having a driving licence. Anyone born after 1988 must, however, hold a Brevet de sécurité routière, which has a 15-year limit, and the vehicles are speed limited and can only travel on certain routes.

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