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BREXIT

France down to last 500 post-Brexit residency applications

Just 500 permanent post-Brexit applications for residency in France remain to be finalised, according to EU figures, down from 10,000 outstanding applications in September.

France down to last 500 post-Brexit residency applications
Photo by Thomas Coex / AFP

This figure relates to all Brits who were living in France before December 31st 2020, and is well down on the 10,000-plus outstanding applications reported shortly after the deadline passed in September 2021.

The EU’s sixth joint report on the implementation of residency rights under part 2 of the Withdrawal Agreement brings together data from all EU member states – and the UK – on post-Brexit residency applications.

It revealed that 164,900 applications had been concluded, out of a total of 165,400 received.

Of those, 105,600 applications for permanent residency (a 10-year carte de séjour) were approved, along with 46,700 applications for non-permanent residency (the five-year carte de séjour).

A total of 3,500 were classed as “refused” – though this figure includes duplicate applications; and 9,100 were withdrawn.

On top of the 500 applications still being dealt with by local authorities, a further 361 applications were reported as incomplete, the EU study shows.

The question of the number of Britons living in France had long been in doubt, as – unlike many EU countries – France does not require EU nationals to register for residency.  Most estimates had put the figure at around 200,000 people.

The figure of 165,000 relates to adult Brits who were living in France before December 31st 2020 – it does not include under 18s, people who moved after the Brexit deadline, second-home owners or people who have dual nationality with an EU country (eg France or Ireland) and therefore do not require a residency card.

It is still possible to apply for a post-Brexit residency card, if necessary. Children, for example, who were not required to apply first time around will have to when they reach 18.

READ ALSO What to do if you have missed France’s Brexit residency deadlines

France operated a two-stage deadline for Brexit residency – all applications had to made made by the end of September 2021 and since January 1st 2022, Brits who were living in France before December 31st 2020 are required to have a carte de séjour residency card.

Member comments

  1. Great shame ANTS has not been so enthusiastic and diligent with processing the exchange of expired British Driving Licences. According to the Consulate there are several hundred Brits here with long outstanding valid applications unable to drive and lead normal lives. Quite shocking and the British authorities appear completely unconcerned

    1. I agree. I applied for new driving licence in Dec 2019, as my UK one was due to expire Feb 2020. I am still waiting……. and it is now Jan 2022.

      They keep asking for something else intermittently, like another copy of something, which I duly send, but then spend the time waiting again.
      I think this is outrageous, personally. I am reluctant to drive long journeys, (so a friend takes me), but I still drive to town for shopping (I have no other way)…. but it is quite stressful.
      I just wish this bureaucracy would sort out its incompetence.

  2. I agree. I applied for new driving licence in Dec 2019, as my UK one was due to expire Feb 2020. I am still waiting……. and it is now Jan 2022.

    They keep asking for something else intermittently, like another copy of something, which I duly send, but then spend the time waiting again.
    I think this is outrageous, personally. I am reluctant to drive long journeys, (so a friend takes me), but I still drive to town for shopping (I have no other way)…. but it is quite stressful.
    I just wish this bureaucracy would sort out its incompetence.

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BREXIT

French government clarifies post-Brexit rules on pets for second-home owners

Brexit hasn't just brought about changes in passport rules for humans, pets are also affected and now the French government has laid out the rules for pet passports for British second-home owners.

French government clarifies post-Brexit rules on pets for second-home owners

Pre-Brexit, people travelling between France and the UK could obtain an EU Pet Passport for their car, dog or ferret which ensured a hassle-free transport experience.

But since the UK left the EU things have become more complicated – and a lot more expensive – for UK residents wanting to travel to France with pets.

You can find a full breakdown of the new rules HERE, but the main difference for people living in the UK is that that they now need an Animal Health Certificate for travel.

Unlike the Pet Passport, a new ACH is required for each trip and vets charge around £100 (€118) for the certificate. So for people making multiple trips a year, especially those who have more than one pet, the charges can quickly mount up.

UK nationals who live in France can still benefit from the EU Pet Passport, but until now the situation for second-home owners has been a little unclear.

However the French Agriculture ministry has now published updated information on its website.

The rules state: “The veterinarian can only issue a French passport to an animal holding a UK/EU passport issued before January 1st, 2021, after verifying that the animal’s identification number has been registered in the Fichier national d’identification des carnivores domestiques (I-CAD).”

I-CAD is the national database that all residents of France must register their pets in – find full details HERE.

The ministry’s advice continues: “If not registered, the veterinarian may proceed to register the animal in I-CAD, if the animal’s stay in France is longer than 3 consecutive months, in accordance with Article 22 of the AM of August 1st, 2012 on the identification of domestic carnivores.”

So if you are staying in France for longer than 90 days (which usually requires a visa for humans) your pet can be registered and get a Pet Passport, but those staying less than three months at a time will have to continue to use the AHC.

The confusion had arisen for second-home owners because previously some vets had been happy to issue the Passport using proof of a French address, such as utility bills. The Ministry’s ruling, however, makes it clear that this is not allowed.

So here’s a full breakdown of the rules;

Living in France

If you are living in France full time your pet is entitled to an EU Pet Passport regardless of your nationality (which means your pet has more travel rights than you do. Although they probably still rely on you to drive the car/book the ferry tickets).

Your cat, dog or ferret must be fully up to date with their vaccinations and must be registered in the national pet database I-CAD (full details here).

Once issued, the EU Pet Passport is valid for the length of the animal’s life, although you must be sure to keep up with their rabies vaccinations. Vets in France usually charge between €50-€100 for a consultation and completing the Passport paperwork.

Living in the UK

If you are living in the UK and travelling to France (or the rest of the EU) you will need an Animal Health Certificate for your cat, dog or ferret.

The vaccination requirements are the same as for the EU Pet Passport, but an ACH is valid for only 10 days after issue for entry to the EU (and then for four months for onward travel within the EU).

So if you’re making multiple trips in a year you will need a new certificate each time.

UK vets charge around £100 (€118) for a certificate, although prices vary between practices. Veterinary associations in the UK are also warning of delays in issuing certificates as many people begin travelling again after the pandemic (often with new pets bought during lockdown), so you will need to book in advance. 

Second-home owners

Although previously some French vets had been happy to issue certificates with only proof of an address in France, the French government has now clarified the rules on this, requiring that pets be registered within the French domestic registry in order to get an EU Pet Passport.

This can only be done if the pet is staying in France for more than three months. The three months must be consecutive, not over the course of a year.

UK pets’ owners will normally require a visa if they want to stay in France for more than three months at a time (unless they have dual nationality with an EU country) – find full details on the rules for people HERE.

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