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Desperate to move to France before Brexit? You should read this

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Desperate to move to France before Brexit? You should read this
Max Speed/Flickr
This content was produced independently by The Local and contains advertiser links.
15:42 CET+01:00
Many Britons it seems are desperately hoping to make their move to France or other EU countries before Britain is scheduled to leave the EU on March 29th - just over three weeks time. But if you're one of them, you should read this note of caution first.
Facebook groups for Britons in France have seen a flurry of posts from people desperate to move here before Britain's departure from the EU.
 
There are questions on the easiest way to find a job from people seemingly willing to take any kind of work in order to get their foot in the door in France before the deadline, as well as queries on the best way to find accommodation quickly.
 
Estate agents in parts of the country have also in recent months reported a flurry of activity from potential buyers looking to make the move before March 29th - the date when the UK is set to leave the EU as things stand.
 
Many Brits who had plans to move to France before Britain voted to leave the EU are not willing to give up their dream and some have decided since Brexit that they want to make their move here while they still have the chance. 
 
 
If the UK crashes out of the EU on March 29th, which has long been the fear of many, then that leaves them less than four weeks to get their foot in the door, which would be a tall order in itself.
 
However Britons who want to make a last ditch attempt to move to France before Brexit need to consider not just whether they can find a job or somewhere to live but also whether they will be 'legal residents' in time for Britain's withdrawal from the EU. 
 
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How Brexit is making the dream move to France more complicatedPhoto: Alexshyripa/Depositphotos

This could end up being complicated and is something people need to spend some time investigating.

"We're seeing really large numbers of people moving heaven and earth to get a legal foot in France before Brexit day. With time so tight it's even more important to be clear on what legal residence means," says Kalba Meadows, the head of the Citizens Rights team at Remain in France Together.

"People thinking of trying to arrive before March 30th still need to make sure that they can prove that they're legally resident on that date - it's not enough just to have a foot on the soil, even if you already own your own home, but you need to meet all the conditions for legal residence as an EU citizen.
 
 
"So for example if you're retired or not economically active, you need to have 'sufficient resources' to support yourself so that you're not a burden on the state (and there are guideline figures for this) and if you're setting up a business you need to show that it is 'genuine and effective' and not marginal or ancillary."
 
Even if Britain leaves the EU with a deal, meaning a transition period lasting until December 2020 which would give people more time to come and settle in France, it is still necessary to know what being a 'legal resident' means. 
 
Up until now, Britons -- as EU citizens -- have not had to worry about what being a 'legal resident' in France involves, and whether you will be legally resident in France depends on a few important factors.
 
The transition period will basically give movers more time to build up evidence that they have "sufficient resources" to show they won't be a burden on the state.
 
'We need your help. Don't let a no-deal Brexit haunt our lives in France'Photo: AFP
 
And if there's no deal and you come after March 29th?
 
Then new arrivals would have to fulfill all the conditions for 'normal' third country nationals (TCN)," says Meadows.
 
"That means arriving with a long stay visa, which they have to apply for from the Consulate in London, then applying within 2 months of arrival in France for an appropriate TCN carte de séjour.
 
"It's not impossible, but the conditions are tighter than they are at the moment and it's a much more complex procedure."
 
 
So basically much will depend on your personal situation - your income, job, savings as well as whether Theresa May can succeed in getting the backing of parliament for a deal.
 
 
 

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