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LIVING IN FRANCE

Why Monday August 15th is a public holiday in France

It might feel like most of France is already on holiday, but Monday is an extra holiday - here's why.

Why Monday August 15th is a public holiday in France
Don't expect much work to be done on Monday. Photo by Valentine CHAPUIS / AFP

August is holiday season in France, the month when offices close, many small bars, cafés and shops close and people head away from the cities towards the coasts. 

But there are some people still working (bonjour from The Local) and for those people, Monday August 15th is a public holiday. 

August 15th is an important date in the Catholic Church’s calendar – the Assumption of the Virgin, which commemorates the day the Virgin Mary entered heaven.

8 signs August has arrived in France

It’s a public holiday in France, one of several Christian holidays in the secular state’s calendar, but apart from the day off work and some church services not a lot else happens – so don’t be expecting parades or fireworks (we save those for the Fête nationale on July 14th).

As mentioned, many businesses already close up for August, but at least in the cities most shops and cafés will stay open on Monday, since it’s not a major holiday.

This year assomption falls on a Monday, making a nice long weekend – and judging by the traffic warnings issued across the whole of France, many people are taking the opportunity to travel.

When is the next public holiday? 

Brace yourselves, because after Monday, the next national public holiday won’t be until November 1st – Toussaints.

That falls on a Tuesday this year, providing one of the rare opportunities in 2022 to faire le pont.

READ ALSO Why 2022 is a bad year for public holidays

Member comments

  1. Yport (76) has its main village festival – Bénédiction de la mer – on Assumption day, with a parade from the Church to the village to the seafront, a thanksgiving service, lots of artists in the village painting followed by an art auction etc. The Casino stages an open air concert and fireworks display the night before (but this year’s fireworks have been postponed until September as they would have been a fire risk due to the drought and very dry ground).

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EDUCATION

Fees to class sizes – what you need to know about private schools in France

In many countries, private schools are the preserve of the wealthy elite, but France has a wide network of private schools that are well within the financial reach of ordinary families - James Harrington explains more.

Fees to class sizes - what you need to know about private schools in France

The education system in France has its problems – at the start of the new school year some 4,000 teaching posts were unfilled and the government has launched an ‘emergency plan’ for English language lessons – but there’s no doubting there are wonderful schools and wonderful teachers making every effort to ensure children from aged three to 18 get the education they deserve.

However the country also has a sizeable network of private schools and around 15 percent of French children go to a private school. While some are undoubtedly expensive and elite, others are surprisingly affordable and provide an extra option for parents when deciding on  a school for their children.

Here’s what you need to know; 

Different types

There are two types of private school – sous contrat and hors contrat.

Sous contrat schools, of which there are about 7,500 in France, are part-funded by the state – teachers are paid by the Department of Education, for example – but also charge fees. France’s numerous Catholic schools, or regional language schools are usually sous contrat.

Hors contrat schools – which number about 2,500 – must still meet general education requirements but can choose their teaching methods and have no state funding. Private international schools found in most big cities, such as the American School of Paris, are hors contrat, but still follow mainstream teaching methods.

For comparison, there are around 60,000 state schools in France.

Prices

Yes, there are expensive private schools in France. Sending your child to the exclusive Ecole des Roches Private Boarding School, for example, will set you back more than €12,000 a term – not quite Eton or Winchester-level fees, but still well out of the reach of a large portion of the population. But, like Eton and Winchester, they’re not the norm. 

On average, fees for a day pupil – one who goes home at the end of the school day, rather than one who boards at the school – are in the region of around €2,250 a year. Meals are not included, and are generally charged at a slightly higher daily price than at state schools.

Financial aid, including scholarships, may be available for less well-off families.

READ ALSO French school canteens to cut cheese course as inflation bites

Boarding and hours

A large number of state and private schools offer Monday-Thursday boarding. It is not uncommon for pupils who excel at certain subjects or sports to attend collèges or lycées some distance from home, and board during the week.

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Daily school hours, meanwhile, are broadly similar, with children generally starting their school day at around 8am and finishing soon after 4pm on school days. Collège and lycée pupils also go into school on Wednesday mornings, and some may have classes on a Saturday, too.

Popularity

Smaller class sizes and a reputation for “better” results means that private schools are increasingly popular. The number of French private schools has increased steadily over the last decade, and now 15-20 percent of pupils go to a private establishment of some form. 

On the whole, private schools tend to do better in results league tables – perhaps in part because of the additional investment from parents, but also because class sizes tend to be smaller, which allows for more one-to-one education. Smaller class sizes and more individual attention mean they may also be a better option for children who struggle in big schools.

READ ALSO What kind of school in France is best for my kids?

Qualifications

State schools and sous contrat schools teach to the national curriculum, which leads, in turn, to brevet and baccalaureate qualifications.

In contrast, some hors contrat private schools offer different qualifications, including American High School Diplomas and SATs, British GCSEs and A-Levels, or the international baccalaureate.

Religion

Although many sous contrat schools are Catholic, most readily accept non-Catholic children and are not allowed to indoctrinate the Catholic faith. Hors contrat schools, on the other hand, may include a religious element to their teaching.

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