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WEATHER

‘Don’t sleep naked’ – How to get a good night’s sleep in a French heatwave

France's increasing heatwaves also bring with them some hot, sticky and uncomfortable nights - so here are some tips from experts to help you sleep when it's hot.

'Don't sleep naked' - How to get a good night’s sleep in a French heatwave
Sleeping during a heatwave can be difficult. Photo: Yuris Alhumaydy / Unsplash

Heatwaves in France – and across Europe – are becoming more frequent and more intense, and climate experts predict that this trend will continue.

As well as scorching days, many heatwaves are also characterised by night-time temperatures that don’t drop – in many places in France temperatures have stayed above 20C all night during recent heatwaves.

Here, then, are a few tips to keep cool overnight, and enjoy better sleep despite the heat of the night.

Don’t sleep naked

It’s tempting to ditch the PJs when it’s this warm overnight. But sleep experts say this is a mistake, as any moisture from sweat accumulates on your body.

Cotton pyjamas and cotton sheets are very effective in absorbing sweat and taking it away from your body. 

Avoid naps, keep a routine

It’s tempting, but avoid any extra napping during the day.

It’s easier to sleep overnight when you go to bed tired than when you’ve already slept a little. More generally, hot weather can cause us to change our habits. Even small changes can disrupt the sleep cycle.

Try, then, to maintain a routine, and go to bed at your usual time, after doing the things you usually do before bed.

Eat and drink sensibly

Old news, but what you put in your body affects how it performs. Drink sensibly and regularly throughout the day, and avoid having a lot of water just before bed – you’ll only need to go to the bathroom in the night. 

Avoid alcohol, obviously. Yes, it can help you fall asleep quickly, but it also promotes early and abrupt awakening, and you get poorer quality sleep in general. Limiting alcohol is advised in general during a heatwave as it dehydrates you.

And eat light – a diet based on fruits, vegetables, or fish is good when the temperature is high.

Evening shower

Are you used to taking a shower before going to bed? It’s not a bad idea during a heat wave: it lowers the body’s temperature, which helps you fall asleep.

But keep the water lukewarm. A cold shower may be tempting, but the body reacts by generating heat – which is exactly what you don’t want. 

Keep your home cool

If you have trouble sleeping in the heat, the first thing to do is to keep your room – and your home – as cool as possible.

Follow the French tricks of opening your windows early in the morning and late in the evening when the temperature is lower, then shutting both windows and shutters (or curtains if you don’t have shutters) when the sun is high. 

To keep room temperatures the same, open internal doors to allow the air to circulate.

Meanwhile, don’t spend all your time on the PC, playing on a games console or watching TV – screens give off heat that add to the heat of the room.

Fans are good

As long as you’ve been able to keep your room relatively cool, fans work. They help evaporate sweat which, in turn, helps your body regulate its temperature. 

Putting a bowl of ice in front of the fan can also help cool the room.

Humidity works

Some people swear by dampening their sheets before going to bed. But if you’re not used to it, the feeling can be a little disconcerting. You can also place multiple ice containers in the corners of your room which will melt slowly overnight and cool the air.

Still can’t sleep?

Get up and do something relaxing – like read a book, or even write.

But avoid doom-scrolling on your phone, or powering up the laptop … even if you really, really want to read The Local.

The light from personal devices is overstimulating and will, in fact, keep you awake.

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LIVING IN FRANCE

French schools, renting property and vocabulary: 6 essential articles for life in France

From how to quit your job in France to choosing the best French school for your kids and learning all the vocabulary of France's cost of living crisis - here are six essential articles for life in France.

French schools, renting property and vocabulary: 6 essential articles for life in France

In the last two years, many people across the world have either considered leaving or have left their jobs amid the “Great Resignation” (or La Grande démission, en Français). 

If you have thought about quitting your French job, or perhaps you simply want to understand the procedure for resigning in France, we’ve put together a guide that should answer all of your questions. 

EXPLAINED: What you should know if you want to quit your job in France

Next, the French government is recommending that everyone become familiar with this website, and you’ll really to know how to use it if you will be living in France during the winter of 2022-2023. 

Ecowatt is the government’s ‘energy forecasting’ website. It will provide you with daily updates and give you an idea as to whether the electrical grid is under stress due to energy shortages. The Local put together an article on how to sign up for alerts, which will help you keep track of whether your area is at risk for short, localised power cuts this winter.

‘Ecowatt’: How you should use France’s new energy forecasting website?

Amid potential energy shortages this winter and the cost of living crisis, foreigners living with France have been faced with learning a whole new set of French vocabulary words.

It can be difficult to keep up to date with the French news – even for native-French speakers. To help you follow along and stay informed, The Local has compiled a list of French terms you are likely to hear when the government or media discusses inflation, along with their English translations.

The French words you need to understand France’s cost of living crisis

Parenting in a country you did grow up in comes with unique challenges and joys. One thing anglophone parents tend to wonder about is whether or not they should send their children to international schools (where English might be more widely spoken) or opt for local French schools.

The Local spoke with some anglophone parents, and compared the advantages and disadvantages of the various options in order to help you make the best decision for your family. 

What kind of school in France is best for my kids?

Many foreigners living in France prefer renting to buying. When looking for that perfect home or apartment, there are a few things to consider. First and foremost – renting in France depends largely on where you live. Renting in a rural or suburban environment will differ greatly from renting in a big city. Nevertheless – renters across France are faced with the same question: furnished or unfurnished? 

The two options differ in terms of price, convenience, and sometimes availability. You can read The Local’s guide to renting property in France.

Renting property in France: Should I go for furnished or unfurnished?

The 2024 Olympic Games are already on the horizon, even though they might seem far away. The city of Paris and its surrounding suburbs have already begun extensive preparations to host athletes, their families, and the thousands of fans who will come to enjoy the Games.

If you live in France and you are considering attending the games, The Local has put together what you need to know in order to secure your tickets.

How to get tickets for the Paris 2024 Olympics and Paralympics

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