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France lifts all Covid-related travel restrictions as State of Emergency ends

From August 1st 2022 France is no longer under a State of Emergency, and this means several important changes for travellers.

France lifts all Covid-related travel restrictions as State of Emergency ends
The health pass is no longer required at the French border. Photo by JOEL SAGET / AFP

France declared a State of Emergency in March 2020 because of the Covid pandemic, and that state has been extended several times.

From August 1st, however, that is officially lifted, although the government does retain certain powers to impose Covid travel rules.

The key difference for those travelling, is that the end of the State of emergency means the end of all Covid-related restrictions at the border.

Travellers to France – regardless of country they are travelling from – no longer need to provide either proof of vaccination or a negative Covid test, an attestation that they are free of Covid symptoms or any justification for their journey. 

Basically, travel goes back to how it was before the pandemic with no requirement for health-related paperwork. For full details, click HERE.

However, the government has retained the right to reinstate compulsory Covid testing at the border if the health situation changes – for example in the case of the emergence of a concerning new variant.

This can be done if the Health Minister has reported its necessity and “after the opinion of the competent scientific authority” and does not require a debate in parliament to impose, which means that new rules could be imposed quickly. The exact nature of the testing rules would depend on the severity of the new outbreak.

READ MORE: What are the new Covid rules as France scraps its State of Emergency?

The ability to bring in extra testing for those entering or leaving France – if the health situation requires it – remains in place until March 31, 2023. It can be extended from that date if parliament agrees.

The wearing of masks on public transport such as trains, taxis and the Metro remains “strongly recommended” but is no longer compulsory. Airlines have the right to impose mask rules as a condition of travel, so you should check with your carrier before you travel. 

Once in France the majority of Covid-related restrictions have now been lifted – you can read more here.  

Some countries still have requirements for vaccines or testing at the border, so if you are travelling from France, check with your destination country on their rules. 

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STRIKES

UPDATE: French air traffic controllers cancel strike action in September

The main union representing French air traffic controllers has cancelled calls for a strike from September 28th to 30th, after "reaching an agreement with their supervisory ministry."

UPDATE: French air traffic controllers cancel strike action in September

SNCTA, the main union for air traffic controllers said this week that they had lifted their calls for a three-day strike at the end of September after coming to an agreement with France Ministry of Transport. 

In a statement on its website, the SNCTA said “In view of the concrete progress made on the demands, the SNCTA is lifting its [strike] notice for September 28th, 29th and 30th. The strong mobilisation of September 16th was necessary and instrumental for reaching this conciliation in a very constrained calendar. Thank you to all of you!” 

The French ministry of transport has not yet commented on the above agreement or lifting of the strike.

The International Air Transport Association tweeted their support for the SNCTA’s decision to cancel further industrial action, calling Friday’s strike “unnecessary.”

The association also urged the European Union to implement a “Single European Sky.” This reform, which was put forward almost 20 years ago, has not yet reached fruition. It intends to shift the current system of air traffic organisation away from national borders and toward a “coherent zone” in order to reduce emissions and save both time and money.

The strike on September 16th left over 1,000 flights in France grounded, as well as widespread delays and over 2,400 flight cancellations across Europe. 

The SNCTA mobilised for wage increases due to the rising cost of living, in addition to an acceleration of recruitment in order to anticipate a wave of retirements. After Friday’s action, the union had called for further strikes from September 28th to 30th before reaching an agreement with their supervisory ministry. 

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