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EXPLAINED: France’s new rules for advertising rental properties

France is introducing new rules for private landlords from July 1st. Anyone who wants to publish a property listing will need to include certain information that wasn't required before.

From July 1st, private landlords in France will be obliged to supply certain information when advertising a property.
From July 1st, private landlords in France will be obliged to supply certain information when advertising a property. (Photo by Damien MEYER / AFP)

If you are a private landlord and have a property that you want to advertise on the rental market in France, the rules on what information you need to include on the listing have been pretty vague – up until now. 

But an official ruling means that from July 1st that changes. From this date onwards, your advertisement must contain the following information:

  • Rental costs 

Monthly rental costs must be clearly mentioned on your listing. 

READ MORE Nine things to expect when renting an apartment in France

  • Charges

You must include information on any charges that the tenant will incur and information on how these charges can be paid. These charges can include anything from heating costs, to a concierge service. If you want to do an official ‘état des lieux’ or inventory of the property, this costs money. If you want the tenant to cover the cost, you must mention this on the advertisement (as well as the amount). 

READ MORE The vital French vocab for renting property

  • Rent control information

If your property is in an area subject to rent control, you must include the following text in your listing: “zone soumise à encadrement des loyers“.  You must specify the minimum and maximum rental price in your area. 

You can find out if your property is in such a zone by using this simulator

  • Other  

You must include information the the deposit that will be required. You must list the commune or arrondissement where the property is located. You must also provide the surface area of the property as well as information on whether it is furnished or unfurnished. 

READ MORE Renting furnished accommodation in France: What should your landlord provide?

The above information must appear on any advertisement – no matter what form that advertisement takes.

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SECOND HOMES

Tax hikes of up to 60% for French second home owners

Towns and villages through France are raising property tax rates for second-home owners, with many areas voting for the maximum 60 percent increase.

Tax hikes of up to 60% for French second home owners

Even though France’s taxe d’habitation (householders’ tax) is in the process of being phased out for most French residents, second-home owners are still required to pay it.

This year more towns have voted to increase it, and others have recently gained the ability to add a surcharge for second-home owners, with French daily Le Parisien reporting that the residence tax “continues to soar.” 

Municipalities in zones tendues (areas with a housing shortage) have the ability to choose to increase taxe d’habitation by up to 60 percent for second home owners.

From 2023, several new areas – including Nantes – will join the list of zones tendues, meaning they will be able to vote to increase taxes for second-home owners.

This year, large cities such as Bordeaux, Lyon, Biarritz, Arles and Saint-Jean-de-Luz saw their city councils vote to increase the tax at the maximum 60 percent.

READ MORE: Why some French cities are increasing taxes for second-home owners

Some areas have still not chosen to apply the increase, but those looking to buy a second home in France should beware that these municipalities could vote to increase the taxe d’habitation in the future.

In 2020, cities on average voted to increase the residence tax on second homes by 248.50, in comparison to €217 in 2017. This year, that amount is expected to be even higher.

On top of the taxe d’habitation, second-home owners also have to pay the separate taxe foncière property tax, which is itself rising sharply in many areas.

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