Catholic priest murdered in western France

Catholic priest murdered in western France
Illustration photo: Loic Venance/AFP
A man suspected of causing a major fire that ravaged the cathedral in the French city of Nantes last year murdered a Catholic priest in western France on Monday, the interior minister and a source close to the investigation said.

“All my support for the Catholics of our country after the tragic murder of a priest in the Vendée,” Interior Minister Gerald Darmanin wrote on Twitter, saying he was heading to the scene.

According to France 3, the body of the victim was discovered on Monday in Saint-Laurent-sur-Sèvre, about twenty kilometres from Cholet in the Vendée département.

A source close to the investigation, who asked not to be named, said a man had earlier gone to police in the town of Mortagne-sur-Sevre and declared he had killed a priest.

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The man was already under judicial control over the fire at Nantes cathedral in July 2020, the source added.

Darmanin, writing on Twitter, said that the man – a Rwandan national – could not be deported because he was still under judicial control in France.

The priest has been named as Olivier Maire. It is understood that the 60-year-old priest had been welcoming the man into his church for several months.

The man, named as Emmanuel A, has confessed to being behind the fire at the Gothic Nantes cathedral that horrified France on July 18th, 2020.

He had initially been placed under arrest before being freed under judicial control.

Far-right leader Marine Le Pen, who accuses the government of being weak on immigration, sought to seize on the incident, saying that in France “you can
be an illegal migrant, set fire to a cathedral, not be expelled and then reoffend by murdering a priest”.

While firefighters were able to contain the Nantes blaze after just two hours and save the main structure, its famed organ, which dated from 1621 and had survived the French revolution and World War II bombardment, was destroyed.

Also lost were priceless artefacts and paintings, including a work by the 19th-century artist Jean-Hippolyte Flandrin and stained glass windows that
contained remnants of 16th-century glass. Repairs are due to take several years.

The man, an asylum-seeker from Rwanda who has lived in France for several years, had worked as a volunteer at the church.


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