SHARE
COPY LINK

TRAINS

SNCF unveils cheaper prices to tempt customers back to French trains

French train operator SNCF has unveiled a new pricing structure and discount cards for high-speed TGV lines in the hope of tempting customers back to train travel after a year of pandemic-related passenger shortfalls.

SNCF unveils cheaper prices to tempt customers back to French trains
Photo: Denis Charlet/AFP

At a press conference, SNCF bosses unveiled several new measures, including a new Advantage card.

Available to everyone, the card offers a 30 percent reduction on all of the high-speed TGV trains and is valid for a year. The card itself costs €49 and also guarantees a price cap to all destinations. 

The company already operates a series of other discount cards, which will remain in use, but they are targetted at specific groups like children, young people or families.

From June 17th, the company also aims to revise and simplify their schedule, bringing an end to first class tickets that sometimes end up being cheaper than second class tickets. 

In second class, around 25 percent of TGV journeys of approximately 90 minutes will cost no more than €39, 50 percent of journeys of up to three hours will cost no more than €59, and 25 percent of longer journeys will cost no more than €79.

The company will also introduce an annual pass for those who frequently work from home.

Known as the ‘Grand Voyageur’, the scheme is targeted at those who travel by train two or three times per week. 

At the start of 2022, SNCF will also introduce a scheme for seniors, allowing unlimited access (between Mondays and Fridays) on TGV lines for €79 per month. This is similar to the TGV Max, available for young people between the ages of 16-27.

Additionally, ticket refunds and exchanges up to three days before travel – first introduced during the pandemic to allow for rapidly changing health rules – will become permanent.

“By 2030, our objective is to have more than 200 million trips per year thanks to the high speed lines and [the introduction of] these discount cards” said Christopher Fanichet, CEO of Voyages SNCF.

Member comments

  1. May I request that you confirm the details in the paragraph: “In second class, around 25 percent of TGV journeys of approximately 90 minutes will cost no more than €39, 50 percent of journeys of up to three hours will cost no more than €59, and 25 percent of longer journeys will cost no more than €79.”

    From reporting elsewhere, my reading is different, namely that the price cap means that all journeys of less than 90 minutes will cost €39,50 – and these short journeys currently represent 25% of the total number of train journeys take. All journeys of between 90 minutes and 3 hours will have a price cap of €59 – and these medium length journeys currently represent 50% of the total number of train journeys take etc. Clarification would be appreciated.

Log in here to leave a comment.
Become a Member to leave a comment.

LIVING IN FRANCE

France to roll out ID cards app

Technology is being rolled out to allow people to carry their French ID cards in an app form - and could be rolled out to other cards, including driving licences and cartes de séjour residency cards.

France to roll out ID cards app

Holders of French carte d’identité (ID cards) will soon be able to carry certified digital versions of them on their smartphone or other electronic devices, a decree published in the Journal Officiel has confirmed.

An official app is being developed for holders of the newer credit card-format ID cards that have information stored on a chip. A provisional test version of the app is expected at the end of May.

Users will be able to use the ID card app, when it becomes available, for a range of services “from checking in at the airport to renting a car”, according to Thierry Breton, EU Commissioner for the Internal Market.

All French citizens have an ID card, which can be used for proving identity in a range of circumstances and for travel within the EU and Schengen zone – the new app will be in addition to the plastic card that holders already have.

Under the plans, after downloading the app, card holders will need merely to hold the card close to their phone to transfer the required information. According to officials, the holder then can decide what information is passed on – such as proof of age, or home address – according to the situation.

The government has not given any examples of situations in which the app would need to be used, but has set out the main principles and the ambition of the plan: to allow everyone to identify themselves and connect to certain public and private organisations, in particular those linked to the France Connect portal.

READ ALSO What is France Connect and how could it make your life simpler?

Cards will continue to be issued for the foreseeable future – this is merely an extension of the existing system.

Only French citizens have ID cards, but if successful the app is expected to be rolled out to include other cards, such as driving licences, cartes de séjour residency cards or even visas. A digital wallet is being developed at the European level – Member States have until September to agree what it could contain.

READ ALSO Eight smartphone apps that make life in France a bit easier

SHOW COMMENTS