France and Ireland open new ferry routes to bypass UK

France and Ireland open new ferry routes to bypass UK
The number of ferry services running between Ireland and mainland Europe has more than quadrupled compared to last year. Photo: AFP
Ferry companies connecting France and Ireland are opening new routes to avoid red tape and delays caused by Brexit.

Earlier this month, Brittany Ferries opened additional ferry routes between France and the Republic of Ireland. The new routes connect Cork with Roscoff and Rosselare with Cherbourg. Sailings began on February 4th.

Meanwhile Stena Line has started a new weekend link between Dublin and Cherbourg. Stena Line said it was trialling the route and trying to reorganise its sailings to meet a rise in demand.

The number of ferry services running between Rosselare, the closest port to mainland Europe, and the continent has more than quadrupled compared to last year.

 

Passing through Britain is traditionally the fastest and cheapest route connecting France and Ireland, but companies are now avoiding it due to increased bureaucracy around customs and regulatory checks.

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“There are now almost forty weekly direct sailings between Ireland and France, keeping our EU Single market connected by sea,” the Irish Embassy in Paris tweeted. 

 

Corsica Ferries, a France-Italy based ferry company, will operate a new service between Ireland, England and Cherbourg in France, as a consequence of the drop in traffic in the Mediterranean caused by the pandemic, and the need for new routes in the Irish Sea caused by Brexit.

The company's Mega Express Four ferry arrived in Dublin last week. It will be used to connect Ireland with Britain during the week, and will be chartered by Irish Ferries to connect Dublin with Cherbourg at the weekend.

“Our ships are currently available due to Covid-19. There are very few crossings between Corsica and Sardinia at the moment,” Corsica Ferries president Pierre Mattei told radio station France Bleu.


Member comments

  1. So, Brittany Ferries passengers will eventually be able to enjoy the magnificent view of the snowy white chalk cliffs of the World Heritage Site Jurassic Dorset coast as the Ferry sails into Poole Harbour.

  2. Surely, there has always been a route between Roscoff and Cork ? I used it back in the early 1990s. In those days it was a bit long and choppy.A couple of Ferries ( Brittany)
    are coming to Poole( where I live ) and Portsmouth having been diverted from their usual routes in the Baltic. We are very happy to welcome dear Brittany Ferries back.

  3. Solid – don’t talk about the EU as if it were a country – you might like to dream that it is but it’s not. The UK is as much a part of Europe as Norway and Switzerland, who, presumably,’hate the EU’ as well. Also, don’t pretend that the Brits have a monopoly on disagreeing with the EU bureaucracy, many of the member states have large sections of voters who are equally dissatisfied.

  4. Can the EU and UK not just block up the tunnel by mutual consent? The English hate the EU, and Europe doesn’t care that they hate us. England is so fantastic and best in every way – apparently. Yet for some reason, the English need to leave their glorious paradise to prove it to themselves. Why not stay there guys, you know you’ve won?

    It’s the all win situation. England is best, EU is rubbish but will live with it.

  5. The majority of eurotunnel is own outside of the UK, let nature take its course. The physical assets will still exist and will be snapped up clean of old baggage by fresh investors. Charge all non-UK reg vehicles a Swiss style annual “vignette” at gbp50 a pop that’ll help the finances.

  6. Won’t be long before they are reducing the size of the Dover operation. Of course the Tunnel can start doing day trips to . . . . OK, perhaps not. No doubt the UK tax payer will help with the tunnel debt when it explodes.

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