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TODAY IN FRANCE

Today in France: What are the top stories on Friday

Welcome to the round-up of latest news and talking points in France today.

Today in France: What are the top stories on Friday
France is now being run from La Lanterne, in the grounds of Versailles. Photo: AFP

The French government says it believes that Emmanuel Macron caught Covid-19 while in Brussels at an EU summit – a total of five European prime ministers and one EU leader are now self-isolating after contact with him.

He continues to work, though, having moved to the presidential residence in the grounds of Versailles he took part in a video conference on economic development, although French newspaper Le Parisien judged that he looked “slightly paler than usual”.

Obviously he's getting lots of sympathy, including from this unnamed minister who joked 'We look at Gérard Larcher and wonder if he's our future boss' – Larcher is the leader of the French Senate, who protocol dictates takes over the government if the president dies.

 

Brexit

The French government has now published its rules on which British people will need visas to visit after January 1st, and the process is open for people who need to apply.

And we’ve noticed several adverts from health insurance companies targeting Brits and implying that they need private health cover – here’s what the rules actually say.

The traffic chaos in northern France that we reported on earlier in the week seems to be getting worse.

And in this thread, France Info tries to explain the issues around fishing and customs from the French point of view.

 

Protests

French police officers have been protesting on the street over Macron's comments about police violence.

Language

Our French phrase of the day is a wild party – but not the cool kind.

It’s one of the things that French-learners find most difficult – how to master the rolling French R without sounding like a cat coughing up a fur-ball. So we asked a French language expert to share her three-step process for getting it just right.

Covid

Two major French studies into Covid have been published – one uses French national data to show that the virus is three times more deadly than the flu while the other shows why bars and restaurants pose a much bigger risk than shops or public transport.

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TODAY IN FRANCE

Today in France: What are the top stories on Wednesday

Welcome to the roundup of latest news and talking points in France today.

Today in France: What are the top stories on Wednesday
Photo: AFP

France has now reopened its border with the UK, but only to certain groups of travellers. Here’s who can travel to France from the UK and the documents they need to travel with.

And as well as its virus mutation, the UK also seems to have suffered from an outbreak of French-bashing. 

 

Here’s John Lichfield wearily looking back at his 24 years of covering France and seeing this nonsense, as well as examining why this type of xenophobia is not reciprocated by the French. 

Crime

Thee police officers have died after being shot by a man who was holding a woman hostage. The man himself was later found dead, after setting fire to the house in Puy-de-Dôme in central France.

Health

France’s health minister has moved to reassure people that having the Covid-19 vaccine will not be a requirement for accessing services like public transport. This comes after a health bill that stirred controversy – the bill has now been taken off the parliamentary schedule.

Work

France has also made some changes to its labour laws for 2021 – here’s how that could affect you.

Weather

Weather forecasters are predicting late snowfalls for a white Christmas in parts of France.

 

Macron

And in case anyone was worrying about France's Covid-infected president, he is 'doing better' according to his office. Prime Minister Jean Castex, who had been self-isolating since Macron's diagnosis, today tested negative for Covid-19 and can resume his duties in person.

 
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