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HEALTH

MAP: Where in France are Covid-19 cases rising and which areas are low risk?

Covid-19 continues to spread at increased speed across the French territory, and public health authorities now have 88 mainland départements on their risk list. Here's look at what that means.

MAP: Where in France are Covid-19 cases rising and which areas are low risk?
Photo: AFP

Of France's 96 mainland départements, 88 were considered at a “moderate” or “elevated” risk for Covid-19 by Santé Publique France in their latest update on October 1st. 

Mainland France now has just 8 départements which are considered low risk. 

 
A département's level is decided by Santé Publique France in consultation with the regional health authority. A range of factors are taken into account including the number of new cases, the number of clusters, the R rate, hospital admissions and the number of patients in intensive care.

Elevated risk zones

The dark blue areas were those at elevated risk, which generally indicates a high level spread of more than 50 new cases confirmed per 100,000 inhabitants over the preceding seven days.

Moderate risk zones

The lighter blue zones on the map were those at moderate risk.

Santé Publique France labels a département at 'moderate' risk generally when health authorities have registered between 10 and 50 new coronavirus cases per 100,000 inhabitants in the last seven days.

IN NUMBERS: How fast are France's Covid-19 rates increasing?

Low risk zones

These are areas with fewer than 10 cases per 100,000 over the last 7 days and where there is little pressure on the areas hospitals from Covid-19 patients. As the map shows, there are not many of these “low risk” area left in France.

Infection rates over the last seven days

The map below from Santé Publique France also gives an idea of where cases are rising more rapidly than others. The ùap is based on the infection or incidence rates in different départements over the last seven days. The areas coloured dark blue are those with the highest infection rates.

The map is interactive so you can zoom in and hover your mouse over each département to find the infection rate.

 
What about red zones?

You might have also seen the French government's latest map, which assigns all areas in France a shade of red.

This rating is based on both case numbers and the pressure on local hospitals and – crucially – determines what restrictions are in place on daily life.

Areas show in pink have a lower level of restrictions than the red areas and dark red – the 'maximum alert zones' have the most restrictions of all.

So far only two areas – the metropole ares of Marseille and Paris – have been put on maximum risk which involves the closure of all bars, gyms, leisure centres and swilling pools and a ban on gatherings of more than 10 people.

Find out what your area is coloured on the restrictions map HERE.

 
 

 

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HEALTH

Sick patients in France lacking GP to be contacted before summer, minister says

The French minister of health promised that chronically ill patients who aren't registered with a doctor will be contacted by the summer.

Sick patients in France lacking GP to be contacted before summer, minister says

François Braun, France’s Health Minister, said on Monday that all chronically ill patients without a general practitioner will be contacted before the month of June with “concrete solutions”.

There is a general shortage of medécins généraliste (GPs or family doctors) in France, with some areas classed as ‘medical deserts’ where people find it almost impossible to register with a doctor.

The health minister said that people without access to primary care doctors are “deprived of a regular follow-up” and that this is “no longer acceptable” for those with chronic illnesses. These groups will be contacted via Assurance Maladie before the summer, he added. 

Braun’s statements came a few weeks after French President Emmanuel Macron gave a speech to healthcare workers outlining the ways he is seeking to overhaul the health system in the country.

READ MORE: How Macron intends to revive France’s ailing health system in 6 months

In his speech, the president promised that the “600,000 patients in France who suffer from a chronic disease would be offered a primary care doctor – or at least a ‘reference team’ – by the end of the year.”

Macron also discussed plans establish a “Conseil national de la refondation (CNR – or National Council for Reconstruction)” to build a “roadmap” for solutions in the fight against medical deserts.

Approximately six million French people are estimated to lack a primary care doctor, and 600,000 of those people suffer from long-term diseases, according to Franceinfo.

READ MORE: What to do if you live in one of France’s ‘medical deserts’

This issue is aggravated by the fact that almost a third of French people live in medical deserts – or geographical zones where healthcare providers and general practitioners are severely lacking compared to the rest of the country. Generally, this refers to healthcare in the community such as GPs or family doctors, dentists or community nurses, rather than hospitals.

Medical desertification mainly affects rural areas with an ageing population – though they’re also developing in some towns and cities (including some Paris suburbs) as retiring doctors are not replaced and younger medics establish themselves in more dynamic zones, both in terms of economy and activities. 

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