French Days are back after lockdown – but what are they?

French Days are back after lockdown - but what are they?
As the shops reopen 'French Days' are also back. Photos: AFP
You might think every day in France is a French Day, but some days are more French than others. Here's why.

Postponed during the lockdown, 'French Days' are back in France from May 27th, but what are these days exactly?

French Days – which is their actual name in French – is a relatively new tradition of mainly online sales, launched in April 2018 by French e-shopping giants Cdiscount, Rue Du Commerce, Showroomprive.com, Fnac-Darty, Boulanger and La Redoute.

Twice a year, usually in April and September, dozens of online retail websites take part in the French Days, sometimes offering sales up to 80 percent. Discounted items mostly include smartphones, televisions and other high-tech products, as well as household appliances.

As the majority of stores were closed in France in April this year, French Days have been moved and now run from Wednesday, May 27th to Tuesday June 2nd.

And this year retailers hard-hit by two months of closure during lockdown are offering some big discounts to try and lure shoppers back.

“This spring 2020 edition is intended to celebrate the rebirth of commerce,” say the six organisers.
 
“For this first post-lockdown event, we are going to give the French people purchasing power in the categories that interest them: computers, accessories, telephones, small household appliances…”, added Hugues Pitre, the managing director of Rue du Commerce.

There will also be a focus on French-made products in an attempt to boost the French manufacturing industry.

Sometimes nicknamed the 'French Black Friday', the original objective of French days was to get back on top of the American-born craze. The North American tradition quickly won French people over and has now become a way of anticipating Christmas shopping for many consumers, although there are ongoing efforts by politicians to crack down on it.

Sales are tightly regulated in France, with the government setting out the weeks in summer and again in January when shops are permitted to have sales.

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