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FRENCH WORD OF THE DAY

French Word of the Day: m’as-tu-vu

Anyone who has ever taken a stroll past a café in a trendy part of the French capital will certainly have seen a few of these folk hanging around.

French Word of the Day: m'as-tu-vu
Photo: Depositphotos

Why do I need to know m'as-tu-vu?

Everyone has seen those people sitting outside a French café reading the right trendy book and striking the perfect pose with their cigarette and glass of wine. Well, now you have a word to describe them. 

So, what does it mean?

Literally the word translates as 'have-you-seen-me'. But when it's used as one long noun, it means a 'poser', 'show off' or 'attention seeker' – in other words someone vain and pretentious who wants to be seen. 

For example you might say: Oui, elle est très m'as-tu-vu. -'Yes, she's a real poser.'

This word will come particularly in handy to anyone living in Paris where m'as-tu-vuisme (the art of being a poser) is something of a collective hobby. 

You can also use it to describe an object which is a bit 'showy' – for example a sports car or massive sunglasses. 

For example, Est-ce que je dois y aller avec les lunettes de soleil m'as-tu-vu? – 'Should I go with the showy sunglasses?'
 

 

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FRENCH WORD OF THE DAY

French phrase of the Day: Ne me prends pas pour un lapin de six semaines

Being patronised by a Frenchman? Roll out this phrase.

French phrase of the Day: Ne me prends pas pour un lapin de six semaines

Why do I need to know ne me prends pas pour un lapin de six semaines?

Because someone might be trying to take you for a fool.

What does it mean?

Ne me prends pas pour un lapin de six semaines – pronounced ne me pren pah pour un lapan de see sem-enn – translates as ‘don’t take me for a six-week-old rabbit’, and is a go-to phrase to warn people not to mistake you for a fool, someone who doesn’t understand what’s going on.

The podcast Hit West from French regional newspaper Ouest-France suggests that the ‘six weeks’ comes from the age a rabbit is weaned at, and must therefore be ready to survive on its own.

And why a rabbit at all? Well no-one really seems very sure. Rabbits don’t get a good rap in the French language though, to stand someone up is poser un lapin in French.

English-language metaphor equivalents may be, “I didn’t come down in the last shower”, “I wasn’t born yesterday”, or, as Line of Duty’s DCI Hastings might say, “I didn’t float up the Lagan in a bubble”.

Use it like this

Honestly, keep it simple. If someone’s speaking to you in a patronising manner, simply say: Ne me prends pas pour un lapin de six semaines.

Ouest France suggests that this is the ‘more elegant’ way to request that people don’t take you for a fool. It’s not offensive, but it might be a little old-fashioned. 

Alternatives

You can use the more basic version of this phrase – Ne me prends pas pour une idiote (don’t take me for a fool) or the slightly more punchy Ne me prends pas pour un con (don’t take me for a moron).

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