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YELLOW VEST

Inquiry launched after 73-year-old woman seriously hurt in Nice

An inquiry has been launched after a 73-year-old lady was seriously injured during a "yellow vest" protest in Nice on Saturday.

Inquiry launched after 73-year-old woman seriously hurt in Nice
Genevieve Legay at Saturday's protest in Nice. Photo: AFP

Prosecutors there have opened an inquiry to try to establish what happened when 73-year-old Genevieve Legay suffered serious head injuries.

When paramedics evacuated veteran activist Legay from the demonstration she  was bleeding from the head, but still conscious, AFP journalists at the scene noted.

Her daughter later said that she had suffered several fractures to the skull and subdural haematomas.

Arie Alimi, the family's lawyer, told AFP that they would be filing a formal complaint against the authorities for violence against “a vulnerable  person”.

The region's governor would be named in the lawsuit, to be submitted on Monday.

“The police charge was very violent,” he said. “Mrs Legay … has been very badly injured.”

But contrary to some reports, she was in a stable condition and not in a coma, he added.

Photos and video footage from Saturday's protest showed her carrying a rainbow-coloured flag with the word “peace” written on it.

Legay is an activist with the social justice campaign group Attac. The group published a message on its website calling for an inquiry to establish  who was responsible for her injuries.

In an interview with Nice-Matin, President Emmanuel Macron  wished her “a speedy recovery, and perhaps some form of wisdom”.

“When you are frail, and may be pushed around, you do not go to places that are defined as prohibited and do not put yourself in situations like this,” he said.

Both local prosecutors and France's justice minister Sunday pointed out  that protests in some parts of the city centre had been banned.

 

(Genevieve Legay at the protest on Saturday. Photo: AFP)

The minister, Nicole Belloubet, was asked about the incident in an interview with French channel BFMTV.

While wishing Legay a speedy recovery, she said, “I do find it curious all  the same that when a demonstration had been banned, as was the case in Nice, someone goes with the declared intention of demonstrating in that place there.” 

“There were some areas, in some cities, where demonstrations were banned. 

“Following warnings, a person who stays there is likely to commit a crime and it is in this context that the events happened.” 

Nice prosecutor Jean-Michel Pretre said they were doing everything they could to find out what happened.

“When you stay in a protest after the regulatory (police) warning that people have to disperse, it's a crime.”

In Legay's case however, it was not clear whether she had been in the banned area, or on the edge of it, when police moved against the protesters.

 

(There were clashes between police and protesters in Nice, which had banned demos in parts of the city centre. Photo: AFP)

 

Demonstrations this weekend were also banned in certain parts of Paris and in the centres of Toulouse, Bordeaux, Dijon and Rennes.

French courts so far have convicted around 2,000 “yellow vest” protesters of offences since the marches began last November, Belloubet told BFMTV.

“Of the 2,000 convictions that have already taken place, the figure that should be retained is that 40 percent are prison sentences,” she said.

They ranged from one month to three years, according to justice ministry figures. 

The other 60 percent of convictions involved community service, suspended sentences or other non-custodial sentences, the minister added.

Nearly 1,800 cases arising from the protests, in Paris and other French cities every Saturday since November 17, were still to be resolved and a total of 8,700 people had been detained, she said.

More than 40,000 people took to the streets across France on Saturday for the 19th consecutive week of anti-government protests, Interior Minister  Christophe Castaner said.

The government redeployed soldiers from its Sentinelle anti-terror force to guard public buildings in Paris, freeing up 6,000 police in Paris to tackle  any flare-ups of violence.

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PROTESTS

What happened to the rioters who trashed the Arc de Triomphe during yellow vest violence?

A court in France has finally handed out sentences to some of those involved in the vandalism and theft at the Arc de Triomphe in December 2018 - when 'yellow vest' violence in Paris shocked the world.

What happened to the rioters who trashed the Arc de Triomphe during yellow vest violence?
'Yellow vest' protesters clash with police by the Arc de Triomphe on December 1st 2018 in Paris. Photo: Abdulmonam EASSA / AFP

The French court on Thursday sentenced eight people to suspended jail terms and community service for taking part in one of the most violent episodes of the anti-government ‘yellow vest’ protests that rocked France two years ago.

A total of nine stood trial this week for the incident, but one of them, a former soldier, was cleared for lack of evidence, presiding judge Sonia Lumbroso said at the verdict.

The court ruled the suspects were neither the instigators nor the main culprits of the vandalism and looting around the Arc de Triomphe monument in Paris, when scenes of destruction and fierce clashes with police made global headlines.

Most of them had no criminal records.

They were sentenced to 70 hours of community service for entering the monument, but those also found guilty of stealing items such as postcards, Arc de Triomphe models or miniature Eiffel Towers from the gift shop, were fined €100 for theft.

A ‘yellow vest’ protester arrives at the courthouse in Paris to attend the trial of ten people on charge of destruction and theft around the Arc de Triomphe monument in Paris. Photo: Thomas COEX / AFP

One of the group, a man who was caught on camera trying to break down a door with a fire extinguisher, was handed the most severe sentence, a suspended prison term of eight months.

Dozens of cars were set on fire and businesses trashed all along the celebrated Champs-Elysées avenue on December 1st, 2018, the third Saturday of mass demonstrations against President Emmanuel Macron.

READ ALSO: Macron risks losing support from left against Le Pen in French presidential election

He was accused of ignoring the plight of struggling French families and after months of protests he abandoned a planned fuel tax hike and raised spending on the lowest earners.

The protesters had already skirmished with security forces at earlier rallies, but police were unprepared for the rioting that engulfed the capital just a few weeks before Christmas.

Despite firing volleys of tear gas and rubber bullets, the officers were forced to abandon their positions around the Arc de Triomphe, which honours France’s war dead.

Protesters snuffed out the eternal flame over the tomb of an unknown World War I soldier and spray-painted the stone walls with graffiti including “the yellow vests will triumph”.

Others forced their way inside the arch, ransacking the gift shop and damaging scores of artworks, causing damage that cost €1.2 million to repair.

READ ALSO: Is France’s ‘yellow vest’ movement really on its way back?

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