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Here are the 50 new Ryanair routes to and from southern France

The Irish low-cost airline has announced it is creating a new hub in the south western city of Toulouse, complete with 11 new routes. The carrier also confirmed 39 new routes from Bordeaux and Marseille in 2019.

Here are the 50 new Ryanair routes to and from southern France
Photos: AFP

Ryanair on Wednesday officially announced its new plane routes to and from Marseille, Toulouse and Bordeaux, France's second, fourth and ninth most populated cities.

Toulouse is set to become the carrier's third base in France, with Ryanair announcing a further 11 new routes that will operate from Blagnac airport by October (scroll down fonew flight route list).

This will take the total number of Ryanair flights routes to and from la Ville en Rose (the Pink City) to 20.

“We are delighted to announce a $200 million aircraft investment at Ryanair’s third French base in Toulouse Airport, which will deliver one million customers per annum, create 60 Ryanair pilot and cabin crew jobs and support 750 airport jobs,” O'brien added. 

Philippe Crébassa, Chairman of the Board of Toulouse-Blagnac Airport, said: “We are very pleased that Ryanair is strengthening its presence in Toulouse. The opening of a base with two aircraft will allow to develop the offer of the company from the Pink City. The 11 new routes announced by Ryanair are also excellent news for the attractiveness of Occitanie in Europe.”

As of November 1st 2019, the Irish low cost company will also have three aircraft and 90 employees at Marseille Provence airport, allowing for 16 new flight routes between the capital of France’s PACA region and numerous European and Moroccan cities (scroll down for list)

The move represents a return for Ryanair to Marseille after in 2011 it pulled staff and planes out of the Provence Airport following a row over contracts. 

As for Bordeaux, the airline headed by David O’Leary will continue with its plans to transform Mérignac airport into a completely new hub, as first announced in September 2018.

This will mean that by April 2019 Ryanair with link Bordeaux to 23 new destinations, taking the company’s total to 32 (existing Ryanair flights to and from and from Bordeaux-Mérignac are London, Brussels, Milan, Porto, Seville, Rome, Valencia, Fez and Marrakech).

“This is the largest winter flight programme Bordeaux has ever had, it’ll bring an extra 1.4 million people to the city every year, ” announced David O'brien, Ryanair’s commercial director.

Ryanair’s French expansion further consolidates the cheap flights airline as Europe’s first in terms of coverage and passenger numbers.

In France, Ryanair holds 7 percent of the market share.

These are the 50 new routes that will operate from autumn, 2019.

The 11 new flight routes to and from Toulouse airport

From October 2019:

Alicante (2 flights a week)
Brest (3 flights a week)
Budapest (2 flights a week)
Lille (1 flight a day)
Luxemburg (3 flights a week)
Marseille (1 flight a day)
Oujda (2 flights a week)
Palermo (2 flights a week)
Porto (3 flights a week)
Tangiers (2 flights a week)
Valencia (2 flights a week)

The 16 new flight routes to and from Marseille Provence airport

From November 2019:

-Agadir (2 flights a week)
-Alicante (2 flights a week)
-Bologna (3 flights a week)
-Bordeaux (4 flights a week)
-Catane (2 flights a week)
-Copenhagen (2 flights a week)
-Essaouira (2 flights a week)
-Manchester (2 flights a week)
-Milan Bergamo (4 flights a week)
-Naples (2 flights a week)
-Ouarzazate (2 flights a week)
-Prague (2 flights a week)
-Sofia (2 flights a week)
-Strasbourg (3 flights a week)
-Tel Aviv (3 flights a week)
-Toulouse (1 flight a day).

The 23 new flight routes to and from Bordeaux-Mérignac airport

From April 2019:

– Bari (2 flights a week)
– Bologna (2 flights a week)
– Cologne (3 flights a week)
– Copenhagen (2 flights a week)
– Dublin (2 flights a week)
– Krakow (2 flights a week)
– Lisbon (5 flights a week)
– Malaga (2 flights a week)
– Manchester (2 flights a week)
– Marseille (4 flights a week)
– Nador (2 flights a week)
– Nantes (4 flights a week)
– Naples (2 flights a week)
– Ouarzazate (2 flights a week)
– Tangier (2 flights a week)
– Venice-Treviso (3 flights a week)

From November 2019

– Brest (3 flights a week)
– Budapest (2 flights a week)
– Oujda (1 flight a week)
– Palermo (2 flights a week)
– Prague (2 flights a week)
– Strasbourg (3 flights a week)
– Lille (1 flight a day)


 

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TRAVEL

Ryanair demands that Air France give up French airport slots in exchange for state aid

Budget airline Ryanair urged on Wednesday that Air France be forced to give up lucrative French airport slots if it receives more state aid.

Ryanair demands that Air France give up French airport slots in exchange for state aid
Could Air France be forced to give up airport slots if it accepts more aid from the French state? Photo: AFP

Paris is in talks with European Union officials on the delicate issue of state aid to the French flagship carrier, which has already received substantial help from the government.

“Should yet another enormous and illegal state aid bailout occur, then effective remedies must be applied to ensure fair competition in the French market and to protect the interests of the French consumer / visitor,” a Ryanair statement said.

The low-cost airline is based in Ireland and regularly underscores the amount of money being allocated to keep struggling rivals in the air.

In exchange for more aid, Air France must be prepared to give up “a substantial number of its take-off and landing slots at key French airports including Paris Charles De Gaulle, Paris Orly and Lyon,” Ryanair argued.

French officials and the European Commission are currently discussing the terms of a further recapitalisation of the Air France-KLM group, which has suffered from the Covid-19 crisis.

EU officials have already indicated that in exchange for their approval, Air France should give up coveted slots at Paris' Orly airport, which is essentially saturated now.

Air France on the other hand has indicated that such a move posed a serious threat because it was counting on Orly operations to help it rebound from the crisis.

French officials want to avoid putting Air France, which was struggling even before the pandemic, at a competitive disadvantage.

Ryanair urged EU competition chief Margrethe Vestager to “stand firm in her discussions with the French government.

“Either Air France gets no state aid or proper remedies should be put in place to ensure a fair and level playing field for all airlines,” it insisted.

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