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LANGUAGE AND CULTURE

‘A crime against culture’: French writers outraged by ‘sub-English’ takeover at Paris book fair

Dozens of French writers and intellectuals have condemned the apparent overuse of simplified English to promote an upcoming book fair in the French capital, calling it “an unbearable act of cultural delinquency”.

'A crime against culture': French writers outraged by 'sub-English' takeover at Paris book fair
Photo: AFP

A special event at the famous Salon du Livre book fair in March titled “Scène Young Adult”, has been slammed by a group of more than a hundred writers and journalists for featuring words such as “photobooth”, “bookroom”, “bookquizz” and “le Live” on its stands and promotional posters. 

“Is it no longer possible to speak French at a fair in Paris devoted to books and literature?” the group mused in an opinion piece published in Le Monde.

They claim the linguistic gaffe illustrates the spread of “Globish”, a term trademarked by French engineer Jean-Paul Nerrière to describe a type of “sub-English” non-native English speakers use in the context of international business.

“For us intellectuals, writers, teachers, journalists and lovers of the French language, (Young Adult) represents the straw that broke the camel’s back in terms of our indulgence, our fatalism at times,” wrote the authors of their column.

“This usage of the English term ‘young adult’, it’s referring to French literature and directly addressing young French people who are looking to read, this is too much.

“It’s become an aggression, an insult, an unbearable act of cultural delinquency.”

The group, including writers of the likes of Tahar Ben Jelloun, Jean-Louis Fournier, Jean Michel Guenassia and Leila Slimani called for the people behind the event to “exclude any English terminology when it isn’t essential”.

“We know that this is not only a question of fashion, of chic modernity, we know very well that the reason for it is basically business and marketing, linguistic imperialism to better sell same products “, they argue.

“We’re asking that France’s Minister of Culture take care of this, with much more commitment than he does currently, in terms of ensuring the defense and respect shown towards the French language.”

The event is set to take place March 15 to 18.

OPINION: France's fight against new English words is totally stupid

OPINION: France's fight against new English words is 'totally stupid'
 

Member comments

  1. Language is evolving all the time and always has done. It’s about time these so called intellectuals got on board with it.

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LANGUAGE AND CULTURE

Le Havre rules: How to talk about French towns beginning with Le, La or Les

If you're into car racing, French politics or visits to seaside resorts you are likely at some point to need to talk about French towns with a 'Le' in the title. But how you talk about these places involves a slightly unexpected French grammar rule. Here's how it works.

An old WW2 photo taken in the French port town of Le Havre.
An old WW2 photo taken in the French port town of Le Havre. It can be difficult to know what prepositions to use for places like this - so we have explained it for you. (Photo by AFP)

If you’re listening to French chat about any of those topics, at some point you’re likely to hear the names of Mans, Havre and Touquet bandied about.

And this is because French towns that have a ‘Le’ ‘La’ or ‘Les’ in the title lose them when you begin constructing sentences. 

As a general rule, French town, commune and city names do not carry a gender. 

So if you wanted to describe Paris as beautiful, you could write: Paris est belle or Paris est beau. It doesn’t matter what adjectival agreement you use. 

For most towns and cities, you would use à to evoke movement to the place or explain that you are already there, and de to explain that you come from/are coming from that location:

Je vais à Marseille – I am going to Marseille

Je suis à Marseille – I am in Marseille 

Je viens de Marseille – I come from Marseille 

But a select few settlements in France do carry a ‘Le’, a ‘La’ or a ‘Les’ as part of their name. 

In this case the preposition disappears when you begin formulating most sentences, and you structure the sentence as you would any other phrase with a ‘le’, ‘la’ or ‘les’ in it.

Masculine

Le is the most common preposition for two names (probably something to do with the patriarchy) with Le Havre, La Mans, Le Touquet and the town of Le Tampon on the French overseas territory of La Réunion (more on that later)

A good example of this is Le Havre, a city in northern France where former Prime Minister, Edouard Philippe, who is tipped to one day run for the French presidency, serves as mayor. 

Edouard Philippe’s twitter profile describes him as the ‘Maire du Havre’, using a masculine preposition

Here we can see that his location is Le Havre, and his Twitter handle is Philippe_LH (for Le Havre) but when he comes to describe his job the Le disappears.

Because Le Havre is masculine, he describes himself as the Maire du Havre rather than the Maire de Havre (Anne Hidalgo, for example would describe herself as the Maire de Paris). 

For place names with ‘Le’ in front of them, you should use prepositions like this:

Ja vais au Touquet – I am going to Le Touquet

Je suis au Touquet – I am in Le Touquet 

Je viens du Touquet – I am from Le Touquet 

Je parle du Touquet – I am talking about Le Touquet

Le Traité du Touquet – the Le Touquet Treaty

Feminine

Some towns carry ‘La’ as part of their name. La Rochelle, the scenic town on the west coast of France known for its great seafood and rugby team, is one such example.

In French ‘à la‘ or ‘de la‘ is allowed, while ‘à le‘ becomes au and ‘de le’ becomes du. So for ‘feminine’ towns such as this, you should use the following prepositions:

Je vais à La Rochelle – I am going to La Rochelle

Je viens de La Rochelle – I am coming from La Rochelle 

Plural

And some places have ‘Les’ in front of their name, like Les Lilas, a commune in the suburbs of Paris. The name of this commune literally translates as ‘The Lilacs’ and was made famous by Serge Gainsbourg’s song Le Poinçonneur des Lilas, about a ticket puncher at the Metro station there. 

When talking about a place with ‘Les’ as part of the name, you must use a plural preposition like so:

Je suis le poinçonneur des Lilas – I am the ticket puncher of Lilas 

Je vais aux Lilas – I am going to Les Lilas

Il est né aux Lilas – He was born in Les Lilas  

Islands 

Islands follow more complicated rules. 

If you are talking about going to one island in particular, you would use à or en. This has nothing to do with gender and is entirely randomised. For example:

Je vais à La Réunion – I am going to La Réunion 

Je vais en Corse – I am going to Corsica 

Generally speaking, when talking about one of the en islands, you would use the following structure to suggest movement from the place: 

Je viens de Corse – I am coming from Corsica 

For the à Islands, you would say:

Je viens de La Réunion – I am coming from La Réunion 

When talking about territories composed of multiple islands, you should use aux.

Je vais aux Maldives – I am going to the Maldives. 

No preposition needed 

There are some phrases in French which don’t require any a preposition at all. This doesn’t change when dealing with ‘Le’ places, such as Le Mans – which is famous for its car-racing track and Motorcycle Grand Prix. Phrases that don’t need a preposition include: 

Je visite Le Mans – I am visiting Le Mans

J’aime Le Mans – I like Le Mans

But for a preposition phrase, the town becomes simply Mans, as in Je vais au Mans.

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