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French Word of the Day: dégueulasse

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French Word of the Day: dégueulasse
Photo: Depositphotos
16:44 CET+01:00
This French adjective isn't just fun to say, it's also incredibly useful. But be careful, you don't want to use it in the wrong situation.

Why do I need to know dégueulasse?

Dégueulasse is used all the time in casual conversation but be careful, use it in the wrong situation and you could end up making enemies. 

What does it mean?

Dégueulasse is the French equivalent of saying 'gross', 'manky', 'rank' and 'disgusting'. 

It can also mean 'revolting', 'disgusting', 'despicable' and 'out of order!'. 

It definitely falls into the category of informal French and can be used to describe pretty much anything, particularly food or someone's behaviour. 

If you're out having a drink or coffee with friends, use it as liberally as you like, but it's not one to use in polite conversation. 

And naturally, you wouldn't someone to overhear you saying the meal they spent ages labouring over was dégueulasse.

You can also say gros dégueulasse mealnng 'filthy slob.

How is it pronounced?

This can be a tricky one to know how to pronounce if you're looking at it for the first time. 

Here's a handy audio file to help you learn

Examples

Ce gâteau est dégueulasse: ne le mange pas! -- This cake is disgusting, don't eat it!

Il a été puni alors qu'il n'avait rien fait : c'est dégueulasse! -- He was punished when he didn't do anything, it's out of order!

Ce repas chez Fred était dégueulasse. -- The meal at Fred's was disgusting. 

For more French Expressions and French Words of the Day you can CLICK HERE to see our full list

 

 
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