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Holidaymakers ask French mayor to kill off 'loud' cicadas in name of peace and quiet

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Holidaymakers ask French mayor to kill off 'loud' cicadas in name of peace and quiet
Cicada. Photo: Stephen Michael Barnett/Flickr
12:29 CEST+02:00
Holidaymakers in southeastern France have sparked the ire of a local mayor with their complaints over the loud noise made by the area's cicada population.
For many it's a noise that evokes pleasant memories of summer holidays and something which adds to, rather than diminishes, the pleasure of weeks spent in the south of France. 
 
But it seems this isn't the case for everyone. 
 
In fact, two tourists holidaying in the town of Beausset in the Var department of Provence saw fit to take their grievance to the top and complain about the loud noise made by the cicadas to the mayor. 
 
"Tourists have challenged me about them because it [the noise] makes their blood boil," mayor of Beausset, Georges Ferrero, told France Bleu Provence. 
 
The mayor added that when the noise just got too much for the tourists, they tried putting water on the trees to stop the cicadas singing their famous song.
 
Beausset. Photo: Binabik155/Wikicommons
 
And he isn't happy about it, to say the least -- especially after they went as far as to ask if insecticide could be used to kill them off. 
 
"They asked me if I have any insecticides to put on the trees? And how to get rid of cicadas," the mayor said.  
 
"It's dreadful. I was very shocked. When we come to the south, we know that there are cicadas. We are proud to have them!"
 
Despite the insistence of the tourists, whose nationality has not been reported, no follow-up was given to their request, which provoked strong reactions from locals in Beausset. 
 
Nevertheless, these are not the first holidaymakers up in arms about the loud buzz made by cicadas -- in 2016, tourists lodged a complaint against the noise in Bouches-du-Rhône.
 
And it's not just unwanted insect clamour which has been known to irritate tourists in the French countryside. 
 
Earlier in August, an angry holidaymaker who wanted a lie-in asked the mayor of the village she was staying in to delay the church bells from ringing early in the morning so that she could sleep in.
 
READ ALSO:
Tourist asks village mayor to silence church bells during her two-week holiday
 
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Leon - 21 Aug 2018 20:08
These people make MY blood boil.If they don't want to accept the wildlife and traditions, such as church bells, then don't holiday in the country.
Stay in your own little city cocoon and allow us, who appreciate where we live, to enjoy the ambience of our chosen part of France.
Personally, I love to hear the changes of seasons with the Frogs and Cicadas singing their hearts out.
I LOVE IT HERE! If you don't, then clear off.
Daniela - 21 Aug 2018 21:10
Hi Leon - I fully agree with you! Couldn't have put it better myself.
CFrance3 - 21 Aug 2018 21:58
Every place has its own unique noises. When we lived in Paris, it was the constant sound of ambulance sirens, the truck emptying the glass recycle bins at 3:00 a.m., and people screaming outside all night long. Who are you going to complain to? It is what it is. Enjoy the good parts and ignore the bad.

I personally feel sad when the cicadas start, because it signals the end of summer. But at the same time, I love their sound.
Harry-I - 03 Jan 2019 17:41
Another thumbs up for Leon. Those people make my blood boil. I think the Charente is too far north for the cicadas but we loved them when we lived on our boat in the south. Now we have a pond with a loud and proud population of frogs.
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