Editions:  Austria · Denmark · France · Germany · Italy · Norway · Spain · Sweden · Switzerland

Air France head resigns after staff reject pay deal

Share this article

Air France head resigns after staff reject pay deal
Air France-KLM boss Jean-Marc Janaillac. Photo: AFP
18:50 CEST+02:00
Air France-KLM boss Jean-Marc Janaillac announced his resignation Friday after staff at the carrier's French operations rejected a pay deal aimed at ending weeks of strikes.
"I accept the consequences of this vote and will tender my resignation to the boards of Air France and Air France-KLM in coming days," said Janaillac after 55.44 percent of Air France workers voted against accepting a pay rise of 7 percent over four years. 
 
Air France announced on Friday a net loss of €269 million in the first quarter of 2018 and said the strike is set to cost the airline at least €300 million over the course of the year.
 
Each strike day has been estimated to cost the airline between €25 and €30 million, with the three-day strike in February and March costing the company a total of €75 million.
 
The results arrived on the 13th day of strike action, with further strikes scheduled for May 7th and 8th as staff continue to fight for better pay.
 
Staff and management at the French carrier have been locked in a dispute over pay since February.
   
Unions say workers deserve to benefit from years of belt-tightening that have returned the carrier to operating profitability, after seeing their wages effectively frozen since 2011.
 
Management says it cannot afford their demands of a 5.1 percent increase this year, saying it would undo the benefits of the restructuring efforts.
 
READ ALSO:

French strikes: What can I do to avoid plane or train travel misery?

 

Get notified about breaking news on The Local

Share this article

The Local is not responsible for content posted by users.
Become a Member or sign-in to leave a comment.
Advertisement

From our sponsors

Change the world with a master's degree from Sweden's Linköping University

Master's students at world-leading Linköping University (LiU) aren't there simply to study. They solve real-world problems alongside experts in fields that can create a better tomorrow. Do you have what it takes to join them?

Advertisement