SHARE
COPY LINK

BOOKS

Paris bookshop to print books on demand ‘in minutes’

A bookshop in Paris’ Latin quarter will offer the opportunity to have any book from its collection printed in just a matter of minutes.

Paris bookshop to print books on demand 'in minutes'
The bookshop. Photo: PUF

A printing robot named Expresso Book Machine will be introduced to the store, located in Paris's Latin quarter and run by publishing company PUF (French University Press).

Customers can browse a list of available books on a database and place their order, and their book will be printed before their eyes. The whole process takes just seven minutes.

The only requirements are that the book contains fewer than 850 pages and in black and white – only the cover can be printed in colour. The print-on-demand books cost the same price as copies from a traditional bookstore.


PUF head of digital experience Alexandre Gaudefroy demonstrates how the machine works. Photo: Screengrab/20 Minutes

The digital option will not only avoid the problem of unsold books and simplify stock-taking, Alexandre Gaudefroy, head of digital experience at PUF, told BFM TV, but will also “allow the rebirth of out-of-print titles which aren’t profitable to produce in the traditional way.”

The technology for the Expresso Book Machine has been around since the early 2000s, created by Xerox, but seemed superfluous after the rise of eBooks. PUF are banking on customers who like the convenience of digital, but also enjoy the institution of the bookshop and paper book, and have kept the interior of the store traditional with books lining the shelves – although these are not for sale.

“Clients can come and read them freely while spending time in our tea room,” Gaudefroy explained.


 

Member comments

Log in here to leave a comment.
Become a Member to leave a comment.

ECONOMY

France proposes banning free delivery of online shopping due to environmental impact

A parliamentary report denouncing the environmental impact of online shopping has outlined a series of new measures to regulate deliveries.

France proposes banning free delivery of online shopping due to environmental impact
The report proposes measures including banning free deliveries, and requiring companies selling their products online to disclose the carbon footprint of the delivery options on offer. Photo: JOEL SAGET / AFP

The report published on Thursday, written by two senators from the Parti Socialiste and Les Républicains parties and seen by Le Figaro newspaper, aims to reduce the environmental impact caused by the transport of goods.

The measures suggested include banning free deliveries and requiring companies selling their products online to disclose the carbon footprint of the delivery options on offer. 

“In France, nearly 90 percent of the internal transport of goods is carried out by road (…), to the detriment of rail and river freight.

“Twenty-three percent of transport-related greenhouse gas emissions result from heavy goods vehicles and 19 percent from light commercial vehicles,” the report said.

In 2014 a law aimed at supporting small bookstores restricted free deliveries in the online sale of books. Amazon hit back by charging customers just one centime for books dispatched to their homes.

READ ALSO: The French town where local businesses are creating an alternative to Amazon

Accelerated by the pandemic, e-commerce has exploded last year – it represented €112 billion in turnover in France in 2020, according to Le Monde, and 92 percent of French people now shop online. One billion parcels were delivered in 2020, compared to 800 million in 2019.

According to the Agency for ecological transition (Ademe), every online purchase is the equivalent of 12 grams of CO2, the equivalent of driving a car for about 1km.

SHOW COMMENTS