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Who said the French don’t put in enough hours at work

French workers are often cast as workshy due to the country’s 35-hour week but one study shows that when it comes to overtime the French are putting in more hours than in many countries.

Who said the French don't put in enough hours at work
Photo: AFP

A new survey revealed that 27 percent of French workers do more than 15 hours of overtime each week – equivalent to almost two days of work.

That figure compares to the global average of 14 percent, according to the report from Regus, a workspace provider.

Obviously the figures differ from one industry to the other – in consulting 31 percent of workers do at least 15 hours overtime each week and in IT the figure was 30 percent.

In the retail and media/marketing sector the percentage pf workers doing overtime stood at 28 percent, while in banking it was just over 27 percent of workers who were slogging away for an extra 15 hours or more each week.

The study also revealed that when it came to where in France the workers were putting in the most graft, it wasn’t where you might have thought.

The northern city of Lille topped the rankings with 37.5 percent of workers staying behind for 15 hours or more, followed by four cities in the south and centre: Nice (37 percent), Toulouse (31.6 percent), Bordeaux (28.6 percent), and Lyon (28 percent).

Parisians only came in sixth on the list where 25 percent of workers declare to have worked the equivalent of seven days a week each week.

It was the city of Marseille (17.6 percent) where the workers put in the least amount of overtime.

However another stat suggests a slightly different view with 63 percent of French people saying they put in between one and 12 hours extra each week, compared to global average of 79 percent.

The high levels of overtime by French workers are explained by the fact the official 35 hour French working week is the lowest in the EU.

Although most workers in France work an average of 39.2 hours each work, the 35-hour legal limit is used as a reference to work out overtime.

So basically it’s easier for the French on full time contracts to build up overtime.

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SEX

French ‘have more sex while working from home’, poll claims

For most people working from home means rarely changing out of PJs and spending a lot of time on zoom calls - but respondents to one French poll said for them it's an opportunity to have more sex.

French 'have more sex while working from home', poll claims
A change from the classic work-from-home outfit of pyjamas. Photo: AFP

A poll conducted by Ifop for extra-marital dating site Gleeden reported one third of respondents (34 percent) saying they had had sex during working hours while on télétravail (home working) and one third of people said they had more desire for their partner since the second lockdown in October.

In total 18 percent of people said they are having more sex now than they did before the pandemic.

“I've got into the habit, since I've been working at home, of taking a little nap in the middle of the day,” web designer Tomas told Le Parsien, “and my girlfriend often joins me”.

“Sometimes we even warm up beforehand with very explicit messages. In the end, it doesn't take us long, we are very relaxed afterwards and just as efficient when we get back behind our screens to work. Frankly, it's better than a cigarette break in the cold outside the office.”
 
The trend was particularly marked among couples with children, when working hours have become time spent together at home without the children around.
 
“Unlike in the spring, the children are at school and without our travel time, our days are longer,” said Sophie, a civil servant based in Strasbourg, who works two days a week at home with her husband.
 
However, some of the participants told pollsters that lockdown and working from home had lead to a drop in morale and libido, while others said being with their partners all day dampened their desire.
 
The French government still recommends télétravail for those who can, but in January released an updated protocol adding extra days in office for those who wanted them, recognising the impact of loneliness and isolation on many home-workers.
 
The poll – entitled The sexual and emotional life of the French during the second lockdown – was carried out on 2,017 over-18s between November 24th and 30th.
 
 

 

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