SHARE
COPY LINK

CRIME

20 years for Paris nanny who murdered employers

A Chinese nanny has been jailed for 20 years by a Paris court for murdering and chopping up her employers after their two-month-old baby died in her care.

20 years for Paris nanny who murdered employers
The judge followed the prosecutor’s recommendation of 20 years behind bars for Hui (R). Illustration: Benoit Peyrucq/AFP

Hui Zhang, 34, had admitted killing the couple, Ying Wang and Liangsi Xui, during a violent row at her home after they learned the little boy had died.

The judge followed the prosecutor’s recommendation of 20 years behind bars for Hui, who had claimed she acted in self-defence as the furious parents attacked her and her boyfriend Te Lu, also 34, with a butcher’s knife.

Te, who was a co-defendant in the case, was acquitted.

As the trial opened on Tuesday, Hui confessed to the killing, saying: “It’s true, I killed them, and I will regret it for the rest of my life.”

She and Te had decided to offer the child’s parents money to try to get them not to report the boy’s death. They invited the parents to their home, but said their plans quickly went awry faced with the fury of the grieving couple.

Te testified that he fell unconscious during the fight and remained so while Hui chopped up the two bodies in the bathroom with an electric saw, using the washing machine to cover the noise.

“I was sucked into a whirlwind of nightmares but I am innocent,” Te told the court.

Hui then wrapped the body parts in rubbish bags and scrubbed her apartment clean. Te later helped her get rid of the remains, transporting them “by foot or public transport” to the forest of Vincennes, east of Paris, a policeman said.

Prosecutors cast doubt on Hui’s claim of self-defence and said there was no proof Te had taken part in the murders.

The case first came to light in June 2012 after two joggers came upon a leg, cut off at the ankle, in Vincennes forest. Several days later, a guide dog found a human torso in the same area, but the hunt for further remains was fruitless.

Before the bodies could be identified, Hui and Te turned themselves in. They then directed police to the locations of more body parts around the forest.

However, they did not find the baby’s body, which Hui said she had thrown in rubbish bins along with some of the other remains.

 

POLICE

French police fire on fleeing suspects, killing one

French police opened fire on a vehicle whose driver attempted to flee when they approached, killing a passenger, prosecutors said on Friday.

French police fire on fleeing suspects, killing one

The incident follows a series of fatal shootings by officers that has revived debate over their use of force.

A patrol of four officers spotted the car, which had been reported stolen, in a parking lot in Venissieux, a suburb of the southeastern city of Lyon, just after midnight.

As they were about to check the occupants’ identity, the driver suddenly tried to flee, hitting an officer who was thrown onto the vehicle’s bonnet

He and another officer then fired several shots, prosecutors said, and when the car stopped moving, the patrol found two occupants with serious injuries.

The passenger died at the scene and the driver was hospitalised, and a police source said doctors declared him brain-dead.

The officers who opened fire were being questioned by the police’s internal investigations agency, a routine practice when officers use their weapons in the course of duty.

Police violence has been in the spotlight after several fatal shootings by officers, which critics see as a systemic use of excessive force and heavy-handed tactics by French security forces.

This month, police officers shot and killed a knife-wielding man, later identified as homeless, at the Charles de Gaulle airport outside Paris.

In June, police shot a woman dead in a car in northern Paris after the vehicle failed to stop when summoned by officers and then allegedly drove towards them at speed.

In April, prosecutors charged a 24-year-old officer with involuntary manslaughter after he used his assault rifle to shoot at a car that sought to escape a patrol in Paris, killing the driver and injuring a passenger.

And last March, angry residents clashed with police during several tense nights in the suburbs north of Paris to protest a fatal shooting by an officer against a van that had been reported stolen.

Under French law, the only justification for an officer using a weapon is when his or her life is in danger.

Particularly contested are patrols carrying assault rifles, which authorities began issuing after mass killings by jihadists in Paris on November 13th, 2015, and a subsequent wave of deadly Islamist attacks.

The government has vowed to take action to restore confidence in security forces, and the divisive issues of police violence and crime were brought to the fore in France’s presidential election this year.

Police unions say officers often face hostility and attacks, and are faced with the difficult task of trying to maintain order in impoverished high-rise housing estates that in some cases are centres of drug dealing and other criminality.

SHOW COMMENTS