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METRO

Six Paris Metro stations you really have to visit

Tourists visiting Paris are normally advised to stay well clear of the Paris Metro, but there is a whole alternative underground sightseeing experience worth checking out. Here are six Paris Metro stations definitely worth going underground for.

Six Paris Metro stations you really have to visit
Photo: Zlatko Unger/Flickr

Travel experts at the Paris Pass have gone underground to uncover the true beauty of Paris’ metro stations. From original art nouveau entrances, to cleverly curated platforms, the Paris subway system is a network worthy of much more than getting from A to B. There’s plenty to appreciate in terms of art and culture, so take your adventures to another level: under the busy streets of the French capital.

Louvre-Rivoli

8, rue de l'Amiral de Coligny

The Louvre is arguably one of the most popular attractions in Paris thanks to its vast collection of art works. Welcoming over 9 million visitors a year, it’s not surprising then that the Paris underground had to reflect the style and stature of this renowned museum. Built in 1990 at the same time as the new glass pyramid, the Louvre-Rivoli metro station is lined with replica art works to echo the pieces within the museum itself.


(Photo: silktwisteddagger/Flickr)

Although this recently renovated station no longer provides access to the museum itself, visitors passing through on Paris transport can still admire the uniquely curated platforms. Palais Royal-Musee du Louvre on the other hand is the Louvre Museum’s main metro station now, which is another must-see on your metro art tour. The unique Place Colette entrance is made from multi-coloured glass baubles and well worth a look. 

Concorde

Place de la Concorde × Rue Royale

Concorde is one of the big interchanging stations in the Paris underground, linking lines 1, 8 and 12. It’s the main station to head towards if you’re planning on visiting the Orangerie Museum or walking up the Champs Elysées. Opened in 1990, it is one of the most recognisable stations in Paris thanks to the walls of the line 12 platform.


(Photo: sabdevinc/Flickr)

The artistic genius behind the décor was artist Françoise Schein who covered the tunnel with lettered tiles all spelling out the 1789 Déclaration des Droits de l'Homme et du Citoyen. Trying to spot as many words as possible before the train pulls in is a wonderful way to pass the time! Did you know Ezra Pound’s 1912 poem In a Station in the Metro was inspired by this Concorde station, as well?

Abbesses

Rue des Abbesses

As one of only two original art nouveau glass canopies, or édicules (kiosks), left in Paris, the entrance to the Abbesses Paris subway station is something to be admired. Built by Hector Guimard, the entrance was originally covering the metro at Hôtel de Ville before it was moved to the picturesque area of Montmartre, home to the Sacré Coeur, in the 1970s.


(Photo: Zlatko Unger/Flickr)

You might also recognise the station (and the area) if you’ve watched the popular cult film Amelie. Abbesses is the deepest metro station at 36m under the pavements of Paris and as you wind your way down the stairs to the platforms you’ll be able to see the brightly coloured murals and graffiti-covered walls.

Pont Neuf

Rue du Pont Neuf

Pont Neuf is the oldest bridge in Paris, although its name ‘new’ suggests otherwise. Built in 1607 it’s one of Paris’ most popular landmarks and favoured by visitors taking a romantic walk across the River Seine to the Île de la Cité to visit the Notre Dame and Sainte-Chapelle.


(Photo: dierkschaefer/Flickr)

The theme of the Pont Neuf Paris underground station represents the Monnaie de Paris (Paris Mint) just around the corner. You’ll see along the walls of the platforms are large replicas of French coins, as well as display cabinets and scales for weighing money.

Bastille

Place de la Bastille

Step back in time and learn a bit about French history at Bastille station. The walls were decorated in 1989 by Liliane Belembert and Odile Jacquot to celebrate the bicentenary of the French Revolution. Standing on the platform, you can see the five frescoes depicting historic French scenes – almost like something out of a museum.


(Photo: betta_design/Flickr)

Bastille is famously the site where the prison was stormed on 14th July, marking the start of the French Revolution. Hop off at this station if you want to see the Bastille Basin, too, a charming little boat basin linking Canal Saint-Martin to the River Seine.

Arts et Metiers

Rue Réaumur

You definitely won’t have seen anything like this station before. Vaulted and clad completely in copper, the Arts et Metiers station was designed to feel like a submarine, complete with portholes and exposed bolts. The Arts et Metiers (Art and Craft Museum), just above contains some of the most fascinating displays of technological evolution, including vintage cars and planes, as well as Foucault’s pendulum.


(Photo: stephen_rees/Flickr)

The Arts et Metiers station, whose redesign was based on the writing of French novelist and adventurist Jules Verne, is a great reflection of the museum itself – leading you into the wonderful world of artistic creation and invention.

It’s safe to say that if you depart on an art tour of Paris you’ll be just as likely to find inspiration from what’s below ground as what’s above. 

About us:

The Paris Pass is the ultimate sightseeing package which provides access into over 60 world famous museums, art galleries and monuments in Paris. Made up of the Paris Museum Pass, Paris Attraction Pass and Paris Visite Pass, it could be purchased for 2, 4, or 6 fixed day durations. Discover and explore Paris the easy way with the Paris Pass.

 
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TRAVEL

The Paris transport works that could disrupt your summer

Every year, major engineering works take place on the capital's public transport network in July and August, when Parisians flee the city for their summer holidays. Here’s the lines affected this year.

The Paris transport works that could disrupt your summer
Photo: Ludovic MARIN / AFP.

Metro

The most significant changes to Metro lines will take place on line 6. The line will be closed between Montparnasse-Bienvenüe and Trocadéro throughout July and August, and the Nationale station will remain closed until the end of August. Replacement bus services will be available but will add time to your journey.

The Mairie des Lilas stop will also be inaccessible from June 26th, so line 11 line will end at Porte des Lilas until August 29th.

There will also be disruption on line 14, with no trains running between Gare de Lyon and Olympiades from July 25th until August 22nd, as work takes place to extend the line to Paris Orly Airport.

RER

Services on the RER A line will be suspended between Auber and the Université, Cergy and Poissy stations from June 26th until August 29th, every day from 9pm and all day on weekends.

From August 9th to 13th, and August 16th to 20th,  services will be suspended all day between Auber and La Défense, and no trains will be running to or from Poissy.

Frequent work is planned on RER B, which will affect journeys between the city centre and Charles de Gaulle and orly airports. There will be no services between Aulnay-sous-Bois and Charles de Gaulle 2 Airport on the weekend of June 26th-27th, or any day after 11pm from July 1st until August 27th. There will however be a replacement bus.

Services between Charles de Gaulle terminals 1 and 2 will also be suspended on July 3rd and 4th. Likewise for journeys between Gare du Nord and Charles de Gaulle 2 on August 14th and 15th.

Improvements take place during the summer, when public transport is less crowded. Photo: Aurore MESENGE / AFP.

The Luxembourg stop meanwhile will be closed throughout the whole of July. As will the Fontaine-Michalon station to the south of Paris from June 28th to July 23rd, and Denfert-Rochereau every weekend from July 24th until August 22nd.

The RER C will also see its share of engineering works, with no trains running between Pontoise and Avenue Henri Martin on weekdays after 9:30pm, from July 1st until July 13th.

There is greater disruption to come on weekends from July 15th to August 21st. Services will be suspended between Musée d’Orsay and Pontoise, Saint-Quentin en Yvelines and Versailles Château Rive Gauche, and Massy – Palaiseau and Pont de Rungis Aéroport d’Orly.

Tram

Most tramlines will be unaffected by works, but there will still be interruptions in certain areas. Notably, the stretch of the T3b line from Porte de Vincennes to Delphine Seyrig will be blocked between July 3rd and 9th.

Full details of the disruption can be found on the RATP website.

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