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Hebdo cartoonist: 'I won't draw Muhammad'

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Hebdo cartoonist: 'I won't draw Muhammad'
Cartoonist Luz presents a copy of the survivors' edition in January featuring a drawing of the Prophet Mohammed. Photo: AFP
08:34 CEST+02:00
Charlie Hebdo cartoonist Luz, whose drawing of Muhammad adorned the front cover of the magazine the week after terrorists massacred the editorial team, has said he will no longer draw the prophet in future.

Luz's famous cover image in January portrayed Muhammad with a sign saying "Je Suis Charlie" under the words "All is forgiven".

At the time Luz said the team had no doubt about depicting the prophet on the front cover of what became known as the "survivors edition".
 
"We trust in people's intelligence and in their humour and irony," he said.
 
Referring to the two gunmen who killed eight members of his team including the editor Stephane Charbonnier, Luz said they simply "lacked a sense of humour".
 
But now the cartoonist says he has no interest in depicting Muhammad.

"I will no longer draw the figure of Muhammad. It no longer interests me," he told Les Inrockuptibles magazine in an interview published on Wednesday.

"I'm not going to spend my life drawing (cartoons of Muhammad)."

The issue came out a week after the attack by jihadists on the magazine's office left 12 dead. It had a print run of eight million -- a record for the French press.

"The terrorists did not win," Luz told Les Inrockuptibles.

"They will have won if the whole of France continues to be scared," he added, accusing the far-right National Front of trying to stir up fear in the wake of the attacks.

SEE ALSO: French Muslims react to Charlie Hebdo Muhammad cover

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