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ISLAM

Mother faces court over boy’s ‘I am a bomb’ top

The mother and uncle of a three-year old named Jihad, who was born on September 11, were due in a French court on Wednesday for sending him to school in a top with "I am a bomb" written on it.

Mother faces court over boy's 'I am a bomb' top
Lawyer Gaelle Genoun (right) leaves Avignon's courthouse on December 19, 2012, with the mother of a three-year old Jihad. Photo: Anne-Christine Poujoulat/AFP

The sweatshirt also had the words "Jihad, born on September 11" emblazoned on the back when he turned up at his nursery school in the southern town of Sorgues on September 25.

The family and their supporters claim it was a harmless attempt at humour but they were charged with condoning a crime over the alleged reference to the 9/11 attacks on New York's twin towers in 2001.

Their trial, due to take place in December but adjourned until March 6, will take place in the town of Avignon.

The uncle bought the top and the mother dressed her son in it when she sent him to school that day.

Jihad's teacher alerted the authorities and a few days later the town mayor, Thierry Lagneau of the conservative UMP party, asked prosecutors to investigate.

"I condemn the attitude of the parents who shamefully took advantage of the person and the age of this child to convey a political message," Lagneau said at the time.

The prosecutor in Avignon previously told the court the family must have known the reaction the boy’s clothing would provoke.

“At some point there must be limits. They are not stupid. They understand the significance of what they are doing,” he said.

The mother and uncle of the boy, who official records show was born on September 11, 2009 and was given Jihad as his first name, were not known Islamists, prosecutors said.

The mother was astonished at the reaction to her son's top and at the proportions the affair had taken on, they added.

The uncle, Zeyad Bagour, was equally outraged the case has ended up in court. “We are accused of condoning a crime, It’s ridiculous,” he told France Info radio.

The family are supported by the local branch of the organisation Movement against Racism and for Friendship between Peoples (MRAP).

Josette Pessemesse, from the far-left Front de Gauche party, wrote an open letter to the court defending the “right to humour”. It was signed by around 50 people.

“This is the same as qualifying all Muslims as terrorists,” Pessemesse told France Info.

The pair risk a €45,000 fine and a one year prison sentence if found guilty.

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ISLAM

Erdogan calls French separatism bill ‘guillotine’ of democracy

Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan on Wednesday denounced a planned French law designed to counter "Islamist separatism" as a "guillotine" of democracy.

Erdogan calls French separatism bill 'guillotine' of democracy
Erdogan has already denounced the proposed measures as "anti-Muslim". Photo: Adem ALTAN/AFP

The draft legislation has been criticised both inside France and abroad for stigmatising Muslims and giving the state new powers to limit speech and religious groups.

“The adoption of this law, which is openly in contradiction of human rights, freedom of religion and European values, will be a guillotine blow inflicted on French democracy,” said Erdogan in a speech in Ankara.

The current version of the planned law would only serve the cause of extremism, putting NGOs under pressure and “forcing young people to choose between their beliefs and their education”, he added.

READ ALSO: What’s in France’s new law to crack down on Islamist extremism?

“We call on the French authorities, and first of all President (Emmanuel) Macron, to act sensibly,” he continued. “We expect a rapid withdrawal of this bill.”

Erdogan also said he was ready to work with France on security issues and integration, but relations between the two leaders have been strained for some time.

France’s government is in the process of passing new legislation to crack down on what it has termed “Islamist separatism”, which would give the state more power to vet and disband religious groups judged to be threats to the nation.

Erdogan has already denounced the proposed measures as “anti-Muslim”.

READ ALSO: Has Macron succeeded in creating an ‘Islam for France’?

Last October, Erdogan questioned Macron’s “mental health”, accusing him of waging a “campaign of hatred” against Islam, after the French president defended the right of cartoonists to caricature the prophet Mohammed.

The two countries are also at odds on a number of other issues, including Libya, Syria and the eastern Mediterranean.

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