Advertisement

McDonald's set to make fries '100% French'

Author thumbnail
Dan MacGuill - [email protected]
McDonald's set to make fries '100% French'
File photo: L4S/Flickr

McDonald’s in France is aiming to make their French fries true to their name, vowing to sell only 100% Made In France 'frites' by the end of 2013.

Advertisement

Amid the rustic, traditional setting of the annual Paris 'Salon de l’Agriculture'  (Agricultural Fair), CEO of McDonald’s in France, Jean-Pierre Petit, is set to strike a blow on Monday for the Made in France brand.

Petit is expected to sign an agreement with the McCain company to ensure 100% of all fries sold in French McDonald’s restaurants will come from potatoes grown in France.

Last year, McDonald’s sold around 66,000 tonnes of fries but only 70% of those chips came from French grown potatoes, with the rest mainly from Belgium.

This year however, McCain France have vowed to plant 4,000 hectares of potatoes in French fields, which managing director Anne-Sophie Fontaine says will be enough to fulfill the nation's cravings, French daily 20 minutes reported.

To meet the pledge McCain France will sign around 100 new contracts with French farmers.

The American fast-food behemoth, already uses 100% French flour in making its burger buns and bread for the French market, but only 50% of its burgers are from cows reared in France.

The French fries pledge is the latest attempt by McDonald's to integrate its brand into French culture.

Earlier in February, the global chain launched a ‘Great Cheese Temptation’ campaign in France, introducing gallic mainstays like camembert into the McDonald’s burger.

In April 2012, the company, which has 1,260 restaurants in France, announced the ultimate Franco-American taste combination, the ‘McBaguette.’

More

Comments

Join the conversation in our comments section below. Share your own views and experience and if you have a question or suggestion for our journalists then email us at [email protected].
Please keep comments civil, constructive and on topic – and make sure to read our terms of use before getting involved.

Please log in to leave a comment.

See Also