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Daughter finds remains of resistance fighter

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10:27 CEST+02:00

A woman has discovered the remains of her father, a WWII Belgian resistance fighter, 68 years after he was shot by the Nazis.

Belgian WWII resistance fighter Charles de Hepcée was shot with fourteen other resistance fighters in a forest, the Bois de la Reulle, north of Toulouse, in 1944, according to French daily La Dépêche. 

But it’s 68 years after his death that his daughter Rose de Hepcee and a historian Georges Muratet finally found his remains and discovered how he died. 

"We exchanged information. And everything indicated that Charley was there... We couldn’t stop crying as we continued searching," says Muratet, in an interview with Le Dépêche.

It’s thanks to De Hepcée’s DNA that authorities identified the remains. 

De Hepcée was a Belgian aviator who joined resistance networks in 1940. According to La Dépêche, he organised a network of fighters in the Pyranees called "Rose-Claire". In 1944, he was arrested and transferred to a prison in Toulouse. He was then taken to a forest with fourteen other fighters, where he shot. 

 

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