France’s first lady Carla Bruni-Sarkozy has admitted to disguising herself to travel incognito in Paris. 

"/> France’s first lady Carla Bruni-Sarkozy has admitted to disguising herself to travel incognito in Paris. 

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CARLA BRUNI

Carla dons wig for private Paris escapades

France’s first lady Carla Bruni-Sarkozy has admitted to disguising herself to travel incognito in Paris. 

Carla dons wig for private Paris escapades
Peter Potrowl

“With a wig nobody recognises me in the metro,” says former model and first lady Carla Bruni-Sarkozy in an interview with the weekly Le Nouvel Observateur. “Recently, my handbag was even searched in the museum of the Navy.” 

“Fame isn’t difficult to bear because I like to disguise myself literally and figuratively,” says Bruni-Sarkozy. 

In a recent interview, the glamorous first lady admitted to rather unusual habits to escape the formality of the Elysée Palace such as wearing a wig.

Bruni-Sarkozy says her way of life is eccentric compared to previous first ladies, such as Claude Pompidou, a philantropist and first lady in the 70s. 

“Next to Madame Pompidou, I’m Lady Gaga!” she said. 

Bruni-Sarkozy has been criticised for being out of touch with common people at a time when the French are suffering from a deep economic crisis. 

As well as being a former model known for her flings with celebrities including Mick Jagger,  Bruni-Sarkozy is also an Italian heiress and a singer.

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TRAVEL NEWS

Revealed: The fastest way to get across Paris

Car, moped, public transport, or electric bicycle - which means of transport is the quickest way to get across Paris?

Revealed: The fastest way to get across Paris

One intrepid reporter for French daily Le Parisien decided to find out. 

The challenge was simple. Which mode of transport would get the journalist from the heart of Fontenay-sous-Bois in the eastern suburbs to the newspaper’s office on Boulevard de Grenelle, west Paris, fastest?

Over four separate journeys, each one in the middle of rush hour, the electric bicycle was quickest and easiest. More expensive than conventional bikes, electric bikes do come with a government subsidy.

The journey was described as ‘pleasant and touristy’ on a dry but chilly morning going via dedicated cycle lanes that meant the dogged journalist avoided having to weave in and out of traffic.

It took, in total, 47 minutes from start to finish at an average speed of 19km/h, on a trip described as “comfortable” but with a caveat for bad weather. The cost was a few centimes for charging up the bike.

In comparison, a car journey between the same points took 1 hour 27 minutes – a journey not helped by a broken-down vehicle. Even accounting for that, according to the reporter’s traffic app, the journey should – going via part of the capital’s southern ringroad – have taken about 1 hr 12.

Average speed in the car was 15km/h, and it cost about €2.85 in diesel – plus parking.

A “chaotic and stressful” moped trip took 1 hour 3 minutes, and cost €1.30 in unleaded petrol.

Public transport – the RER and Metro combined via RER A to Charles-de-Gaulle-Étoile then Metro line 6 to the station Bir-Hakeim – took 50 minutes door to door, including a 10-minute walk and cost €2.80. The journey was described as “tiring”.

READ ALSO 6 ways to get around Paris without the Metro

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