Police protection for presidential Green candidate Eva Joly has been stepped up after she received a threatening letter containing a bullet.

"/> Police protection for presidential Green candidate Eva Joly has been stepped up after she received a threatening letter containing a bullet.

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EVA JOLY

Protection stepped up for Green candidate after bullet sent in post

Police protection for presidential Green candidate Eva Joly has been stepped up after she received a threatening letter containing a bullet.

Protection stepped up for Green candidate after bullet sent in post
N4thaniel

Europe 1 reported on Wednesday that the former senior magistrate will now, like other senior politicians, receive protection from the elite SPHP force (Service de protection des hautes personnalités).

Eva Joly has had a difficult campaign so far with several unpleasant scenes, including being jostled in the metro and acts of aggression after some public meetings.

In December her campaign director, Sergio Coronado, made an official request for police protection to the interior ministry. She will now have two officers to protect her.

Joly has been the target of attacks not only for her policies but also her Norwegian roots. 

The trace of a Norwegian accent is often the source of jokes and criticism at her expense. Joly herself has spoken of feeling “discouraged” at times by the attack and said she considers them to be “racist.”

The leader of the far-right Front National, Marine Le Pen, attacked Joly in December for policies which she considered “francophobic.”

“All her propositions are ridiculous and often francophobic,” she said, also on Europe 1. “She regularly expresses her hostility towards everything that is patriotic.”

Joly provoked particular ire after suggesting that the traditional military parade that takes place every year on Bastille Day, July 14th, could be replaced by a “citizens’ parade.” 

The proposal was widely condemned at the time by politicians from all sides.

One parliamentarian from the governing UMP party wrote on his Twitter account that it was “time for her to return to Norway.”

Although she is well known, particularly for the distinctive red glasses she wears on the end of her nose, Joly has failed to make an impact with voters so far. Opinion polls currently give her around 3 percent of votes.

An opinion poll published in December by the weekly VSD magazine named Joly as the third most annoying politician in France, behind Socialist Ségolène Royal and former IMF chief Dominique Strauss-Kahn.

 

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FRANCOIS HOLLANDE

Hollande steps up eurobonds push

President Francois Hollande stepped up his push Thursday for the launch of eurobonds after a summit of EU leaders in Brussels exposed divisions on the issue.

Hollande steps up eurobonds push
LCP Assemblee Nationale

Hollande said he wanted to see eurobonds “written into the agenda” of the European Union going forward, saying he saw jointly pooled eurozone debt as a fundamental means of bolstering the debt-stricken single currency.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel has repeatedly come out against eurobonds and Hollande told a news conference after five hours of talks among EU leaders in Brussels he had a “different conception” of what eurobonds offer Europe.

He said: “There is perhaps a means by which to mutualise… future debt to enable countries… to access financing more easily on (money) markets.”

Suggesting this would allow governments to “finance investments”, the new Socialist president said that pooling liabilities for past debts was “unacceptable” but that eurobonds could help countries paying high borrowing costs, such as Spain and Italy.

Merkel said there had been a “balanced” discussion on eurobonds.

“There was a debate on the subject of eurobonds, but very balanced and with different points of view,” she said after the summit.

She said she had “explained the German position” and Hollande “said what he had already said previously, but there were broad differences”.

Several participants expressed doubts about the benefits of interest rates being unified across the eurozone, Merkel added.

Hollande said he was not alone at the EU table in favouring the introduction of eurobonds.

EU president Herman Van Rompuy said the subject was “briefly touched upon” by several leaders “in the framework of deepening the monetary and economic union”.

However, he stressed: “There was nobody asking for the immediate introduction of this.”

He underlined, as leaders begin preparing ideas for a growth pact ahead of a full summit on June 28-29: “We have to consider what the legal implications of all this are.”

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