France on Thursday deployed police to Paris's main Charles de Gaulle airport to ensure a strike by security workers does not hamper holiday travel, the interior ministry said.

"/> France on Thursday deployed police to Paris's main Charles de Gaulle airport to ensure a strike by security workers does not hamper holiday travel, the interior ministry said.

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AIRPORT

Police sent in to ease holiday airport strike

France on Thursday deployed police to Paris's main Charles de Gaulle airport to ensure a strike by security workers does not hamper holiday travel, the interior ministry said.

The strike by workers demanding wage increases continued for a seventh day on Thursday, but has so far had a limited impact on international flights, with only some delays reported.

 

The police officers will work alongside non-striking security workers and will be responsible for checking passengers and baggage, an interior ministry spokesman said.

President Nicolas Sarkozy had on Wednesday said the government would use “all necessary measures” to ensure the French holiday season was not “taken hostage” by the strike action.

Negotiations have so far failed to resolve the dispute and on Wednesday union representatives walked out of mediated talks.

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STRIKES

French customs officers strike over job cuts

Customs officers across France will walk out on Thursday in protest at job cuts that unions say will “weaken the customs network”.

French customs officers strike over job cuts

The national strike on Thursday, March 10th is expected to lead to delays at ports, airports and on the Eurostar.

The strike, which will include a rally outside the National Assembly building in Paris, was called by the CFDT-Douane and has the support of other unions. 

A work-to-rule protest over pay and conditions by customs officers in 2019, under the shadow of Brexit, led to delays and disruption at airports, as well as ports including Calais and Dunkirk, and on Eurostar trains.

Unions are calling on the government to axe plans to switch responsibility for import duty collection to the Direction Générale des Finances Publiques by 2024, at the cost of 700 customs’ officer jobs – and, according to strikers, tens of billions of euros to State coffers.

“We are asking for the reforms to be stopped, mainly that of the transfer of taxation, which is disorganising the network with the elimination of nearly a thousand jobs,” CFDT-Douane’s secretary general David-Olivier Caron said.

The planned job cuts come after years of restructuring and streamlining that has seen thousands of positions disappear, the unions say, when customs fraud and smuggling is rising because of a lack of resources.

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