A strike by security officers stretched into its fourth day on Monday, with warnings that action could spread to other airports.

"/> A strike by security officers stretched into its fourth day on Monday, with warnings that action could spread to other airports.

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AIRPORT

Airport strike moves into fourth day

A strike by security officers stretched into its fourth day on Monday, with warnings that action could spread to other airports.

Airport authorities in Lyon, which has been hardest hit, said 30 percent of Monday morning’s flights would be cancelled.

All morning flights were cancelled at Lyon’s Saint-Exupery airport on Sunday while passengers at Paris’ Roissy airport were waiting up to ninety minutes to clear security.

Security staff working for private company Brink’s launched their action on Friday over a dispute concerning salary and working conditions.

Brink’s attacked the “intransigence” of the strikers and accused them of “taking passengers hostage.”

To cut waiting times, passengers were being advised not to bring unusually shaped bags to airports, such as skis or golf bags. Such bags “would not be loaded on-board,” said an official at Lyon’s airport.

Daily newspaper Metro reported the frustrations of many passengers who were kept waiting at the weekend.

“I’ve had to come here three times for nothing,” said Myriam, waiting for a flight in Lyon. “The airline only told us about the cancellation a half-hour before departure.”

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STRIKES

French customs officers strike over job cuts

Customs officers across France will walk out on Thursday in protest at job cuts that unions say will “weaken the customs network”.

French customs officers strike over job cuts

The national strike on Thursday, March 10th is expected to lead to delays at ports, airports and on the Eurostar.

The strike, which will include a rally outside the National Assembly building in Paris, was called by the CFDT-Douane and has the support of other unions. 

A work-to-rule protest over pay and conditions by customs officers in 2019, under the shadow of Brexit, led to delays and disruption at airports, as well as ports including Calais and Dunkirk, and on Eurostar trains.

Unions are calling on the government to axe plans to switch responsibility for import duty collection to the Direction Générale des Finances Publiques by 2024, at the cost of 700 customs’ officer jobs – and, according to strikers, tens of billions of euros to State coffers.

“We are asking for the reforms to be stopped, mainly that of the transfer of taxation, which is disorganising the network with the elimination of nearly a thousand jobs,” CFDT-Douane’s secretary general David-Olivier Caron said.

The planned job cuts come after years of restructuring and streamlining that has seen thousands of positions disappear, the unions say, when customs fraud and smuggling is rising because of a lack of resources.

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