The heirs of auto magnate Louis Renault are suing the French state over the nationalisation of his company in the aftermath of World War II. Historians today disagree about the extent of Renault’s collaboration with the Nazis.

"/> The heirs of auto magnate Louis Renault are suing the French state over the nationalisation of his company in the aftermath of World War II. Historians today disagree about the extent of Renault’s collaboration with the Nazis.

" />
SHARE
COPY LINK

COURT

Renault heirs sue France for nationalizing company

The heirs of auto magnate Louis Renault are suing the French state over the nationalisation of his company in the aftermath of World War II. Historians today disagree about the extent of Renault’s collaboration with the Nazis.

Renault heirs sue France for nationalizing company

Renault heirs are to demand reparations in court on Wednesday for the nationalisation of the company in 1945, Le Figaro reports. They say their family received no compensation at the time and the move was unfair punishment for Louis Renault’s attitude during the war.

“No other French company was nationalised in this way,” said lawyer Thierry Levy in an interview with journalists. “some industrial leaders were condemned for collaborating with the Nazis, but their companies weren’t taken away.”

Louis Renault founded the auto company in 1898 with his brother, and was arrested in September 1944. He died a month later in prison without facing trial. At the time of his death, Renault owned 96.8 percent of his company, factories across France and offices on the Paris avenue Les Champs Elysées.

Historians however disagree on Renault’s attitude during the war. Unlike auto manufacturers Michelin or Peugeot, the auto magnate did not build ties with the French Resistance. Historians however say the relationship between Renault and the Nazis has yet to be fully investigated.

Member comments

Log in here to leave a comment.
Become a Member to leave a comment.

TRAVEL NEWS

Revealed: The fastest way to get across Paris

Car, moped, public transport, or electric bicycle - which means of transport is the quickest way to get across Paris?

Revealed: The fastest way to get across Paris

One intrepid reporter for French daily Le Parisien decided to find out. 

The challenge was simple. Which mode of transport would get the journalist from the heart of Fontenay-sous-Bois in the eastern suburbs to the newspaper’s office on Boulevard de Grenelle, west Paris, fastest?

Over four separate journeys, each one in the middle of rush hour, the electric bicycle was quickest and easiest. More expensive than conventional bikes, electric bikes do come with a government subsidy.

The journey was described as ‘pleasant and touristy’ on a dry but chilly morning going via dedicated cycle lanes that meant the dogged journalist avoided having to weave in and out of traffic.

It took, in total, 47 minutes from start to finish at an average speed of 19km/h, on a trip described as “comfortable” but with a caveat for bad weather. The cost was a few centimes for charging up the bike.

In comparison, a car journey between the same points took 1 hour 27 minutes – a journey not helped by a broken-down vehicle. Even accounting for that, according to the reporter’s traffic app, the journey should – going via part of the capital’s southern ringroad – have taken about 1 hr 12.

Average speed in the car was 15km/h, and it cost about €2.85 in diesel – plus parking.

A “chaotic and stressful” moped trip took 1 hour 3 minutes, and cost €1.30 in unleaded petrol.

Public transport – the RER and Metro combined via RER A to Charles-de-Gaulle-Étoile then Metro line 6 to the station Bir-Hakeim – took 50 minutes door to door, including a 10-minute walk and cost €2.80. The journey was described as “tiring”.

READ ALSO 6 ways to get around Paris without the Metro

SHOW COMMENTS