One of France's best-known newspapers failed to appear in news kiosks on Tuesday after journalists and employees stopped working to protest against plans to switch to an online-only version of the 67-year-old title.

"/> One of France's best-known newspapers failed to appear in news kiosks on Tuesday after journalists and employees stopped working to protest against plans to switch to an online-only version of the 67-year-old title.

" />
SHARE
COPY LINK

NE

France Soir set to abandon print version

One of France's best-known newspapers failed to appear in news kiosks on Tuesday after journalists and employees stopped working to protest against plans to switch to an online-only version of the 67-year-old title.

Workers voted to halt production following an announcement by Russian owner Alexandre Pougatchev that the title would switch to an online-only version from December. The move would lead to 89 of the 116 jobs being cut.

“The employees of France Soir reject the planned rapid disappearance of the title accompanied by a large number of redundancies,” said a statement by workers.

The plan to scrap the paper edition of the newspaper will be considered by the Tribunal de Commerce, which mediates on business disputes.

If the tribunal approves the plan, France Soir will be the first French daily newspaper to abandon its print edition.

France Soir was originally launched in November 1944 by two underground resistance fighters, Robert Salmon and Philippe Viannay. 

It was originally published under the title “France Soir – Défense de la France”, reverting to just France Soir after the war.

Circulation grew to 1.5 million in the mid-1950s under its famed editor Pierre Lazareff but had already started falling by the 1960s. Successive management changes and relaunches failed to stem falling sales. 

The newspaper was relaunched in tabloid format in 1998 and again in 2010 after it was bought by Russian billionaire Alexandre Pougatchev. Its current circulation is around the 60,000 level.

1944 was a bumper year for newspaper launches with Le Monde and Le Parisien also being founded. The oldest surviving national daily in France is Le Figaro which was founded in 1826 under the reign of Charles X.

The most widely-read national newspaper in France is Le Parisien, which also publishes under the title Aujourd’hui en France (Today in France) nationally. Its circulation is 470,000. Le Figaro and Le Monde both have circulations of around 320,000. 

The best read newspaper overall in France is regional newspaper Ouest-France which sells around 770,000 copies.

twitter.com/matthew_warren

Member comments

Log in here to leave a comment.
Become a Member to leave a comment.

NE

Bayern hit back at Ribery needle fear claim

Bayern Munich hit back on Friday at claims made by France's World Cup doctor that Franck Ribery's fear of injections had forced him to pull out of the tournament.

Bayern hit back at Ribery needle fear claim
Franck Ribery and French coach Didier Deschamps. AFP Photo: Franck Fife

French team medical chief Franck Le Gall had said Thursday that Ribery, who plays for the German champions and withdrew from the World Cup due to a back
injury, could have still made the trip to Brazil.

"Franck belongs to a club where the treatment for all problems, whatever they are, starts from a base of injections," said Le Gall.

But Bayern doctor Hans-Wilhelm Müller-Wohlfahrt "rejected categorically" the allegations in a statement released through his lawyer.

"Firstly, Dr. Müller-Wohlfahrt made available to the French medical team all the documents and analysis and, secondly, he communicated by telephone his medical opinion," the statement said.

Bayern also rejected Le Gall's claim that Ribery was afraid of injections.

"Ribery does not have, to his knowledge, a fear of needles…he only refused the cortisone injection that had been suggested in France.

"The mere fact that Ribery returned to Munich after pulling out of the France squad to seek treatment without cortisone and without painkillers further highlights this fact."

The statement added: "His participation in the World Cup would have been possible had he been treated by him (Müller-Wolfhart)".

On Thursday, Le Gall said that Ribery could no longer cope with injections.

"He can have 10, 20, 25, 40 per problem, per year. We could have chosen this option, which we didn't do," he explained.

"The time came when he couldn't cope with any more injections, so we didn't do it because he's afraid of injections.

"There was no reason for him not to play at the World Cup but seeing as I'm less well known than certain others, they went to Professor (Gerard) Saillant," added Le Gall, in reference to the sports medicine specialist who has treated the likes of rugby star Dan Carter and Formula One legend Michael Schumacher.

"The exam at the clinic was very reassuring with Professor Saillant but he didn't manage to get past the pain and we didn't find any solutions for him to play without pain.

"He has a lumbago (lower back pain) which has been going on for a few weeks. He had a three-week rest and then played one match he shouldn't have (the German Cup final) where he came on (as a substitute) before having to go off again."

SHOW COMMENTS