Friends of a 33-year-old Indian man who died when he tried to protect a woman who was being mugged on a Paris metro train are trying to raise money to send his body back to India for a funeral. 

"/> Friends of a 33-year-old Indian man who died when he tried to protect a woman who was being mugged on a Paris metro train are trying to raise money to send his body back to India for a funeral. 

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CRIME

Metro hero’s family hopes for Indian funeral

Friends of a 33-year-old Indian man who died when he tried to protect a woman who was being mugged on a Paris metro train are trying to raise money to send his body back to India for a funeral. 

The story of the brave man’s fatal struggle with the mugger led to a wave of outrage and sympathy online when the story appeared on Friday. 

On Thursday evening, around 8.30pm, Rajinder Singh saw a woman being mugged for her iPhone by another passenger. He stepped in to help and became involved in a fight with the attacker. 

The two left the train at the Crimée station on line 7, in the north east of the city, where they continued to struggle. Singh then fell off the platform and onto the tracks where he was electrocuted and died instantly. The mugger fled the scene and is still being hunted by police

News of the story on Friday led to hundreds of comments in support of the man. On Tuesday, newspaper Le Parisien reported more details about him.

Singh was born in 1978 in the northwest Punjab state of India which borders Pakistan. His cousin told the newspaper that he left seven years ago to travel to Europe to earn money to help the family. He came to Paris and got a job delivering pizzas.

Four years ago he met his girlfriend, Vimla, while commuting.

“They both took the same line at the same time to go to work,” said his girlfriend’s sister, Malini. “After a few months, Rajinder spoke to her. Last year, they moved together into a little apartment in Drancy.”

“He worked non-stop, even at weekends. His only worry was earning enough money to be independent and to help his family in India,” she said. “He was kindness personified,” added her husband.

Singh’s mother wants her son’s body to be repatriated to India to “hug him for the last time” and to have a traditional funeral. His friends are trying to find the €5,000 ($6,600) costs.

Newspaper readers offered money and sympathy as the story went online on Tuesday. “Here is a man with high values who has left us too soon,” wrote one. 

See also: Metro death suspect held by Paris police

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CRIME

Hackers post French hospital patient data online

Hackers who crippled a French hospital and stole a trove of data last month have released personal records of patients online, officials have confirmed.

Hackers post French hospital patient data online

The cyberattackers demanded a multimillion dollar ransom from the Corbeil-Essonnes hospital near Paris a month ago, but the institution refused to pay.

The hospital said the hackers had now dumped medical scans and lab analyses along with the social security numbers of patients.

“I condemn in the strongest possible terms the unspeakable disclosure of hacked data,” health minister Fran├žois Braun tweeted on Sunday.

Hospitals around the world have been facing increasing attacks from ransomware groups, particularly since the pandemic stretched resources to breaking point.

The problem has been acute in France, where officials estimated early last year that healthcare institutions were facing on average an attack every week.

President Emmanuel Macron last year called the attacks during the pandemic a “crisis within a crisis” and announced an extra one billion euros for cybersecurity.

During last month’s attack, the Corbeil-Essonnes hospital shut down its emergency services and sent many patients to other institutions.

At one point, officials said the only technology still working was the telephone.

Rather than selling the trove of data, the hacker has dumped at least some of it for download on the “dark web” — a hidden part of the internet that requires special software to access.

Analysts said it seemed to be a tactic to put pressure on the hospital, even though public institutions are banned by French law from paying ransoms.

Cybersecurity researcher Damien Bancal, who revealed the leak and has seen the files, told AFP the worry is that other criminals will now launch scams with the data that has already been divulged.

In response to the leak on the weekend, the hospital severely restricted access to its systems and told patients to be extremely vigilant when receiving emails, text messages or phone calls.

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