Three young people spent an unnerving 48-hours roaming in the dark among the millions of skeletons buried under Paris this week.

"/> Three young people spent an unnerving 48-hours roaming in the dark among the millions of skeletons buried under Paris this week.

" />
SHARE
COPY LINK

OFFBEAT

Drunken prank has spooky end in Paris catacombs

Three young people spent an unnerving 48-hours roaming in the dark among the millions of skeletons buried under Paris this week.

Drunken prank has spooky end in Paris catacombs
Vdegroot/Wikipedia (File)

The two men and one woman were part of a group of five who were reportedly drunk when they went down into Paris’ famous catacombs on Monday evening.

The group became separated with two managing to find their way out. The remaining three, all in their early 20s, were not so fortunate and spent two more days trying to find their way out.

The catacombs in the south of Paris were opened in the late 18th century and hold the remains of an estimated 6 million people. 

 Thousands of tourists visit certain sections of the tunnels where the skulls and bones of the dead are often arranged into artful or ghoulish displays. There are secret entrances to other parts of the underground network all over the city.

The alarm was not raised until Wednesday at which point 35 police officers went down into the tunnels to look for them.

“At that depth, no telephone network or radio frequency works,” a police spokesman told AFP.

Police eventually came across a piece of paper left by the three which said they were lost and that they had headed towards the south of the tunnel network.

They were eventually found later in the afternoon. The three were in reasonably good health, although one was reported as being in “a state of shock.”

As further punishment, the three are likely to face a fine of up to €135 and a ban on going back into the catacombs.

TRAVEL NEWS

Revealed: The fastest way to get across Paris

Car, moped, public transport, or electric bicycle - which means of transport is the quickest way to get across Paris?

Revealed: The fastest way to get across Paris

One intrepid reporter for French daily Le Parisien decided to find out. 

The challenge was simple. Which mode of transport would get the journalist from the heart of Fontenay-sous-Bois in the eastern suburbs to the newspaper’s office on Boulevard de Grenelle, west Paris, fastest?

Over four separate journeys, each one in the middle of rush hour, the electric bicycle was quickest and easiest. More expensive than conventional bikes, electric bikes do come with a government subsidy.

The journey was described as ‘pleasant and touristy’ on a dry but chilly morning going via dedicated cycle lanes that meant the dogged journalist avoided having to weave in and out of traffic.

It took, in total, 47 minutes from start to finish at an average speed of 19km/h, on a trip described as “comfortable” but with a caveat for bad weather. The cost was a few centimes for charging up the bike.

In comparison, a car journey between the same points took 1 hour 27 minutes – a journey not helped by a broken-down vehicle. Even accounting for that, according to the reporter’s traffic app, the journey should – going via part of the capital’s southern ringroad – have taken about 1 hr 12.

Average speed in the car was 15km/h, and it cost about €2.85 in diesel – plus parking.

A “chaotic and stressful” moped trip took 1 hour 3 minutes, and cost €1.30 in unleaded petrol.

Public transport – the RER and Metro combined via RER A to Charles-de-Gaulle-Étoile then Metro line 6 to the station Bir-Hakeim – took 50 minutes door to door, including a 10-minute walk and cost €2.80. The journey was described as “tiring”.

READ ALSO 6 ways to get around Paris without the Metro

SHOW COMMENTS