Dominique Strauss-Kahn and his wife Anne Sinclair left their New York residence Tuesday night for the first time in three days.

"/> Dominique Strauss-Kahn and his wife Anne Sinclair left their New York residence Tuesday night for the first time in three days.

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RAPE

DSK and wife venture out for first time in three days

Dominique Strauss-Kahn and his wife Anne Sinclair left their New York residence Tuesday night for the first time in three days.

Dressed in a dark suit and light shirt, the former director of the International Monetary Fund left his TriBeCa townhouse around 7:30 pm and later arrived on the Upper East Side, where he and his wife entered an apartment building near the Metropolitan Museum of Art for around two hours.

When they returned to their residence, they stood under the watchful eye of the press for some minutes, unable to open their door, journalists told AFP.

Saturday, the couple visited the Museum of Modern Art in Manhattan. That evening, Strauss Kahn enjoyed his first meal as a free man at an Italian restaurant on the Upper East Side; it was the couple’s first outing after a US judge’s decision to lift the house arrest of “DSK.”

The judge’s decision came after New York City prosecutors admitted that the hotel maid that has accused Strauss-Kahn of sexual assault lied to a grand jury.

The former French minister can now come and go as he pleases, but only within the United States, as the judge has confiscated his passport.

But another sex scandal has quickly followed: Tuesday French journalist and writer Tristane Banon filed charges in a Paris court against Dominique Strausss-Kahn for attempted rape in 2003.

In a one word note, David Koubbi “confirmed” to AFP he had sent a complaint by his client, 32 year-old Tristane Banon, to Paris prosecutors who under French law will now decide whether to launch a criminal inquiry.

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ECONOMY

Make reforms while sun shines on world economy: Lagarde

International Monetary Fund chief Christine Lagarde has urged France and other countries to push through reforms "while the sun is shining" on the global economy.

Make reforms while sun shines on world economy: Lagarde
International Monetary Fund chief Christine Lagarde. Photo: AFP

In an interview with France's Le Journal du Dimanche published on Sunday Lagarde said the strength of the global economic recovery had taken the IMF by surprise.

“In 2017, for the first time in a long time, we revised our growth forecasts upwards whereas previously we used to lower them,” she said.

Global growth of 3.6 percent was both “stronger and more widely shared” in 2017, she said, noting that developed economies were now growing again under their own steam and no longer merely being pulled along by demand in emerging markets.

Lagarde said the favourable climate lent itself to implementing reforms.

“When the sun is shining you should take advantage to fix the roof,” she said, using one of her favourite maxims.

This year's global growth is on a par with the average of the two decades leading up to the global financial crisis of 2007-2008.

The IMF has forecast a further slight improvement in 2018, to 3.7 percent.

In Lagarde's native France, seen for years as one of Europe's weak links, the recovery kicked in in earnest this year.

From 1.1 percent in 2016, growth is expected to rise to 1.9 percent in 2017 — still short of the 2.4 percent forecast for the eurozone as a whole but better than the 1.6 percent initially forecast in the eurozone's second-largest economy.

Centrist President Emmanuel Macron aims to consolidate the momentum and bring down stubbornly high unemployment with an ambitious programme of labour, tax and welfare reforms.

Lagarde said the changes were key to boosting France's credibility at a time when Macron is pushing for reforms at the European level, including closer integration among eurozone members.

The managing director of the IMF was France's finance minister in 2008, when the euro looked to be in serious jeopardy.

Nearly 10 years later, the currency is out of the woods.

But, Lagarde warned, “the mission has not been accomplished — and maybe never will — because Europe is not united on moving towards greater integration while maintaining national sovereignty.”