• France's news in English
 
app_header_v3
Charlie Hebdo anniversary
France honours victims of January terror attacks
President Hollande, Prime Minister Manuel Valls, and Paris Mayor Anne Hidalgo unveil a plaque in honour of the a policemen killed in the Charlie Hebdo attacks. Photo: BFMTV

France honours victims of January terror attacks

The Local · 5 Jan 2016, 12:36

Published: 05 Jan 2016 12:36 GMT+01:00
Updated: 05 Jan 2016 12:36 GMT+01:00

One year after the murder of 17 people including eight members of the Charlie Hebdo staff, France began a series of ceremonies to pay tribute to the victims.

As well as the victims at the satirical magazine, those who died at the hands of the terrorists included a maintenance worker, a festival organizer visiting Charlie Hebdo, three police officers and four members of the Jewish community.

President Hollande, flanked by Prime Minister Manuel Valls, Paris Mayor Anne Hidalgo, and several ministers, unveiled plaques on Tuesday in the areas where the victims were killed. 

Under a light drizzle, the entourage held a short ceremony at the former offices of satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo on rue Nicolas-Appert, where Said and Cherif Kouachi gunned down 12 people.

A plaque (see picture above) was unveiled bearing the names of those killed at the Charlie Hebdo offices.

Although in a slight embarrassment for authorities it emerged one of the cartoonists' names was misspelled on the plaque.

Georges Wolinski's name appeared as "Georges Wolinsky" on the plaque that lists the 11 people shot dead in the attack.

Paris city authorities said the company that carried out the engraving of the plaque had made the mistake and would correct the name later on Tuesday.

An official said Wolinski's widow, Maryse, had been informed of the error and the action that was being taken.

Nevertheless she was left fuming.

"This morning, when I saw the 'Y', I can tell you I was furious," Maryse Wolinski told French television.

She said she pointed it out straight away to Paris Mayor Anne Hidalgo, who had unveiled the plaque alongside the president, and was assured that the mistake would be quickly corrected.

Asked what her cartoonist husband would have thought of the typo, Wolinski suggested it was no joking matter.

"He didn't like it at all when (his name was spelled with a 'Y'), that I can tell you. And as for me... frankly I'm hard pressed to see the humour in it because I am too angry."

A similar ceremony took place on Boulevard Richard Lenoir, where a policeman was killed.

Hollande, Valls, and Hidalgo stood silent by the plaques, laying wreaths beneath on the ground below. 

Later in the morning, the politicians are expected to head to the Hyper Cacher supermarket at the Porte de Vincennes where Amedy Coulibaly gunned down four Jewish people.

It was the beginning of a week of events, which will culminate in the unveiling of a memorial plaque in the Place de la Republique, all played out amid tight security with Paris still on edge after the November attacks.

A plaque will also be unveiled in the Paris suburb of Montrouge where policewoman Clarissa jean-Philippe was gunned down by Coulibaly as he was set to attack a Jewish school in the neighbourhood.

On Thursday January 7th, the actual anniversary of the first attack against Charlie Hebdo, President Hollande will give a speech at the police headquarters in Paris where he will honour those who took part in the operation to hunt down the terrorists and the dramatic shoot outs.

Story continues below…

He will also pay tribute to the three police officers killed in the attacks.

On Saturday January 9th Hollande will head to the Hyper Cacher supermarket to mark one year to the day since Coulibaly went on the rampage.

He will attend a ceremony organised by the CRIF, an umbrella group for Jewish organisations in France.

Finally, on Sunday the public are invited to take part in a homage to the victims of the attacks at Place de la Republique, which was the centre of the huge march on the Sunday following the January attacks and was once again the focal point for tributes to the victims of the November attacks.

Survivors, witnesses and the families and loved ones of the victims have been invited to attend alongside city officials.

In the morning, a plaque will be unveiled at the foot of an oak tree specially planted for the occasion.

French singer Johnny Hallyday will perform his song One Sunday in January before the French army’s choir sing the Marseillaise. 

 

Today's headlines
Who is to blame for the fuel crisis in France?
CGT union's workers block with burning tires the access to the refinery of Fos-sur-Mer, southeastern France. Photo: AFP

With petrol stations quickly running empty and the protests set to rumble on, who can be held responsible for the growing crisis?

Paris unveils first stretch of 'bicycle highway'
Photo: AFP

Could Paris be on the way to becoming the new Amsterdam for bikes?

French air traffic control unions call for June strikes
Photo: AFP

Air traffic controllers and thousands of other workers could be set for a three day strike at the beginning of June.

IMF urges France to deepen job reforms
Photo: AFP

The International Monetary Fund has warned France to go beyond its already hotly contested job market reforms.

Dordogne named among the 'best places in Europe'
Photo: Dale Musselman/Flickr

Travel company the Lonely Planet calls the Dordogne "France's foodiest region".

French fuel crisis: 'A quarter' of petrol stations run dry
Workers on strike block the access to the harbour of Saint-Nazaire, western France to protest against the government's planned labour law reforms. Photo: AFP

UPDATED: Over 3,200 petrol stations are now reportedly empty or running dry.

French police 'raid Google's Paris offices in tax probe'
Photo: AFP

Around 100 French officials and police have raided Google's offices in Paris, reports say.

EgyptAir Flight MS804
EgyptAir: Human remains 'suggest explosion on board'
Photo: Egyptian Armed Forces

New findings, if confirmed, would support the theory that a bomb may have brought down the plane.

How to avoid running out of fuel if you're coming to France
How to avoid the fuel crisis in France. Photo: AFP

There are far worse places to be stuck with no fuel than rural France, but here's some official advice on how holidaymakers can avoid becoming stranded.

Special ops units to police Tour de France for first time
Photo: AFP

France is taking security at the Tour de France extremely seriously this year.

National
Here are the parts of France hardest hit by the fuel shortages
Sponsored Article
Eat, learn, live: unforgettable holidays in France
Travel
It will soon be time to say 'au revoir' to the Paris Metro ticket
Culture
Revealed: The ultimate sex map of France
National
Migrants at Calais camp given dignity in death
International
How good is security at Charles de Gaulle airport?
Culture
How to make a traditional French cassoulet
Culture
IN PICS: Commuter trains in Paris get royal makeover
International
Terror attack 'likeliest cause' of missing EgyptAir plane
International
Who was on board the missing EgyptAir flight from Paris?
Lifestyle
New map reveals Paris flat prices by Metro station
Culture
Paris: Here's how to find French cinema in English
Culture
How to say 'OUCH' in French (and ten other sounds)
National
Get ready: France to be hit by week of transport strikes
Culture
France readies for first national 'motorway party'
National
Is this the eco-solution to France's wild-peeing plague?
Sport
Paris mayor wants Seine to be 'swimmable' before Olympics
National
IN PICTURES: Police car torched in Paris protests
National
Why there's another rail strike in France and more to come
National
Why does 'everyone in France hate the police'?
Culture
Foolproof ways to make French friends in France
National
Seventeen French ex-ministers vow to shine light on sex harassment
Lifestyle
French Riviera mega-mansion faces being bulldozed
Culture
Eight ways the French are different to Parisians
2,738
jobs available