• France's news in English
 
app_header_v3
Feminists want 'phallic' Eiffel Tower torn down
File photo: Klearchis Kapoutsis

Feminists want 'phallic' Eiffel Tower torn down

The Local · 1 Apr 2013, 08:00

Published: 01 Apr 2013 08:00 GMT+02:00

Marianne Caster, leader of the campaign which has unified several feminist groups under one umbrella, told The Local on Monday that bringing the tower down to earth would set French women free.

“For too long we have lived under the shadow of this patriarchal monstrosity," she said. "Every day, women in this city are forced to glare up at the giant metal penis in the sky. It may be good for tourism but as long as it stands there, France will never have 'egalité'."

“Since 1889, women have been forced to gaze up at this example of French industrial machismo and colonial arrogance,” said Caster.

The movement led by Caster has been dubbed 'Occoupez Le Tour', a French play on words meaning both ‘Occupy’ and ‘Cut off’ the Tower.

The 320 metre high iron tower is the world’s most visited structure, attracting roughly 7 million tourists each year.

A study last year estimated that the iconic structure is worth €434 billion to the French economy, the equivalent of 25 percent of the country’s GDP.

At a time when France's economy is spluttering to a halt, city authorities in Paris would no doubt be loathe to see it pulled down, but Occoupez Le Tour believe there is more at stake than just revenue for France. 

“Climbed by millions of oblivious tourists every year, this phallic symbol has enchanted the world with its false romance,” the Occoupez le Tour movement said in an open letter addressed to Paris mayor Bertrand Delanöe and French Culture Minister Aurélie Filippetti.

“It is a delusional vision of Paris as the city of love, one which is directly responsible for the behaviour of men like Dominique Strauss Kahn”, added the statement.

The group have demanded a meeting with President François Hollande on the top level of the famous tower to explain their demands. 

Although feminist groups all agree that the tower is an outdated symbol of male dominance, not all are calling for it to be torn down. A rival movement under the banner "Tour pour Tous" (Tower for all) are calling for major renovations to change the design of the tower to make it more female friendly.

'Tour pour Tous' have already drafted in architects to design a new tower which would see the base altered to become rounder and a cross bar built between level and and level three of the tower. (See photo below)

The new look tower wold be given the more female-friendly name 'Le Tour Eiffelle'.

Reaction to the campaign has been swift. Speaking on RTL radio, National Front deputy Alain Bourge said “It’s an outrage. The Eiffel Tower is among the proudest achievements of the French race, and one of the greatest testaments to man’s ingenuity.”

The movement has also been greeted with ridicule in some quarters, and Socialist party deputy Franck Lomme assured his Twitter followers on Monday that the destruction of the tower was a non-starter.

“Absolutely impossible! Have they nothing better to do than think of ways to ruin my city," he tweeted.

Thierry Barmay from 'father's rights' advocacy group SOS Papa attacked the Occoupez movement on Sunday night. He told The Local "This is nonsense. If anything, 'The Iron Lady' [as the tower is known] should be renamed The Iron Man. What more can these feminists take from us?"

Speaking to TF1 television on Sunday night, ‘Occoupez le Tour’ spokeswoman Caster was not drawn on the practicalities of dismantling and removing the estimated 10,000 tonnes of wrought iron.

“The important thing is that this statue to oppression be severed from the body of France. We’ll probably leave the logistics and the engineering to the local authorities. It’s not really our forte,” added Caster.

Preliminary sketch of redesigned 'Tour Eiffelle'
Image courtesy of 'Tour Pour Tous'

 

April Fools’ update

It’s lunchtime in France, so it’s only fair we own up by now.

As you may or may not have guessed, the above article contains little or no factual content.

The mayor of Paris is named Bertrand Delanöe, just as France’s culture minister is name Aurélie Filippetti, but all other names have been invented.

France is home to a fathers’ rights group called SOS Papa, as well as strong, vibrant feminist traditions.

The Eiffel Tower is safe and sound.

Happy April Fools’ Day!

Your comments about this article

Today's headlines
Paris unveils first stretch of 'bicycle highway'
Photo: AFP

Could Paris be on the way to becoming the new Amsterdam for bikes?

French air traffic control unions call for June strikes
Photo: AFP

Air traffic controllers and thousands of other workers could be set for a three day strike at the beginning of June.

IMF urges France to deepen job reforms
Photo: AFP

The International Monetary Fund has warned France to go beyond its already hotly contested job market reforms.

Dordogne named among the 'best places in Europe'
Photo: Dale Musselman/Flickr

Travel company the Lonely Planet calls the Dordogne "France's foodiest region".

French fuel crisis: 'A quarter' of petrol stations run dry
Workers on strike block the access to the harbour of Saint-Nazaire, western France to protest against the government's planned labour law reforms. Photo: AFP

UPDATED: Over 3,200 petrol stations are now reportedly empty or running dry.

French police 'raid Google's Paris offices in tax probe'
Photo: AFP

Around 100 French officials and police have raided Google's offices in Paris, reports say.

EgyptAir Flight MS804
EgyptAir: Human remains 'suggest explosion on board'
Photo: Egyptian Armed Forces

New findings, if confirmed, would support the theory that a bomb may have brought down the plane.

How to avoid running out of fuel if you're coming to France
How to avoid the fuel crisis in France. Photo: AFP

There are far worse places to be stuck with no fuel than rural France, but here's some official advice on how holidaymakers can avoid becoming stranded.

Special ops units to police Tour de France for first time
Photo: AFP

France is taking security at the Tour de France extremely seriously this year.

How French rail services will be hit by this week's strike
Photo: AFP

Another tricky couple of days for rail travel lie ahead this week.

National
Here are the parts of France hardest hit by the fuel shortages
Sponsored Article
Eat, learn, live: unforgettable holidays in France
Travel
It will soon be time to say 'au revoir' to the Paris Metro ticket
Culture
Revealed: The ultimate sex map of France
National
Migrants at Calais camp given dignity in death
International
How good is security at Charles de Gaulle airport?
Culture
How to make a traditional French cassoulet
Culture
IN PICS: Commuter trains in Paris get royal makeover
International
Terror attack 'likeliest cause' of missing EgyptAir plane
International
Who was on board the missing EgyptAir flight from Paris?
Lifestyle
New map reveals Paris flat prices by Metro station
Culture
Paris: Here's how to find French cinema in English
Culture
How to say 'OUCH' in French (and ten other sounds)
National
Get ready: France to be hit by week of transport strikes
Culture
France readies for first national 'motorway party'
National
Is this the eco-solution to France's wild-peeing plague?
Sport
Paris mayor wants Seine to be 'swimmable' before Olympics
National
IN PICTURES: Police car torched in Paris protests
National
Why there's another rail strike in France and more to come
National
Why does 'everyone in France hate the police'?
Culture
Foolproof ways to make French friends in France
National
Seventeen French ex-ministers vow to shine light on sex harassment
Lifestyle
French Riviera mega-mansion faces being bulldozed
Culture
Eight ways the French are different to Parisians
2,740
jobs available